Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,228   Posts: 1,532,814   Online: 1009
      
Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 50

Thread: The seeing eye

  1. #21
    fhovie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Port Hueneme, California - USA
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,247
    Images
    92
    I agree that we can (and should) shoot anything until we can create a technically perfect negative and print and then toss it because it doesn't say anything. That is a good exersize for the real test:

    A worthy photograph:
    What did you see?
    What did it say to you?
    How do you feel about it?
    How does your photograph communicate this?

    What is it about old stuff that facinates me? A connection with memories of old loved relatives I visited as a boy? Their ghosts haunting certain photos and I like them for no apperent reason. Why are some landscapes captivating and others boring? Characature exageration of perspective and contrasts (or mysterious fog and shadows) that bring back memories of places I've been (idealized) or dreamed of going?

    As I look through magazines that describe "collectable" photographs, what strikes me is the emotional content. There is something in these photographs that makes a feeling pop up (something deeper then anger or passion) in a great number of people that it reasonates with. Kids often don't get it because it is an "experience insider" idea for a generation or several generations.

    I don't have all day for making photos so I must pick a few that are worth my time and costs. They will be the ones that say more than illustration. They will say .. Did you get it? Did you feel it? Will you look at it closer and think about it later. Does it baffle you and make you dig deeper? Some times I am the only one that gets it. Some time others get it too.

    I just don't ever want them to look like commercial clip art, textbook illustration, random pointless snaps or a remake of someone elses vision.

    That is my thought on it FWIW
    My photos are always without all that distracting color ...

  2. #22
    Joe Lipka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Cary, North Carolina
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    809
    Getting comfortable with gear is the first step toward creativity. Luckily, this stage can be mastered relatively quickly. With LF gear, you can practice at home. Start with your tripod collapsed and camera packed away. Extend tripod, set up camera, focus, set aperture, shutter, insert film holder, remove dark slide, make exposure. Replace dark slide, remove film holder, dismantle camera, return to bag, collapse tripod. Repeat about fifty times.

    Harvey Penick told his golf students to practice as if they were being paid by the hour. No need to rush, just do it the same way. As you get comfortable, it will become easier and quicker. Then, the night before you go out to photograph repeat this exercise about ten times.

    Make this portion of your photographic ritual automatic, so you have time to concentrate on the image before you, not equipment.
    Two New Projects! Light on China - 07/13/2014

    www.joelipkaphoto.com

    250+ posts and still blogging! "Postcards from the Creative Journey"

    http://blog.joelipkaphoto.com/

  3. #23

    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    5,234
    Images
    9
    Aggie.

    Michael SMith has a point. You can't teach a person to see in the sense that they have a connection to the scene. I think many of us can point to the epiphany we had when we were able to be wholly in the moment and truly see. It does not always have to be with a camera, but it has happened at some point. You can teach someone to observe, and you can point out the things that stick out for you but in the end the seeing has to be done by the individual. Above all else they have to be willing to see.

    Not all photos are taken for ourselves. There are many different motives for a photograph. Because we may make something for someone else does not mean that it is any less personal. If people did not seek the affirmation of their peers and only shot for themselves there would be nothing in the gallery for comment. In the end even Michael A. Smith has to have the desires of his collectors and museums in mind when he takes some of his photographs. If not foremost in his mind it is there somewhere. He wants to sell these prints so he is in fact not only working to please himself but the buyer as well IMHO. This in no way lessens the seeing experience for him, or anyone else.

    I would also have to say that photography is a means of communication. creating a photograph means there is a desire to communicate what one sees. When one snaps the shutter, they, somewhere in their brain, hope the scene speaks to someone as it spoke to them. There are many times when I sit with camera poised or set up and never snap the shutter. Those are the personal pictures I take soley for my benefit.
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  4. #24
    mobtown_4x5's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Baltimore
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    244
    It is my hope that digital imaging will liberate photography the way that photography liberated painting. Use digital technology for commercial, scientific and consumer applications, and leave photography to artists.

    Bravo! Well said!

    Matt

  5. #25
    blansky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Wine country in Northern California
    Posts
    5,029
    Jdef said:

    It is my hope that digital imaging will liberate photography the way that photography liberated painting. Use digital technology for commercial, scientific and consumer applications, and leave photography to artists.
    Jdef expound on this for me.

    I know that you are bored with 95% of the photogrpahy that you see from previous posts but I don't think I understand how commercial and consumer applications going digital will all of a sudden make photography more "artistic".

    Just as I don't see how photography liberated painting to make painting, what, less commercial? more artistic?

    Personally I think that 50 years ago there were far less photographers as well as far less photographs inundating our lives. We now are bombarded with hundreds of magazines, hundreds or TV commercials, thousands of images available to view at one sitting on the internet. I think we are just over exposed. When we see so many images we almost unable to see anything as fresh, or original because of this constant bombardment.

    50 years ago I would bet the average person saw maybe 10 or 20 images a day maximum from ads and Life Magazine type publications. Virtually everything then seemed fresh. No mass media.

    Hell, at one time the studio portraits that you dislike so much were fresh. There are only so many ways to do them, essentially a copy of studio portrait paintings.

    I just think we are all jaded.

    What do you think?


    Michael McBlane

  6. #26

    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    6,242
    Quote Originally Posted by jdef
    Maybe the reason that technique is so prevalent for so many of us, is that there is an artistic void in our work. Discussing/debating materials and techniques accounts for the vast majority of discussion here, with the occassional thread on "seeing" or "vision", but virtually no discussion of content or meaning. I think the medium itself is stagnating and lacks any real visionaries. I think that realism, commercialism, and duplicability have had a moderating effect on photographers and photography. It is my hope that digital imaging will liberate photography the way that photography liberated painting. Use digital technology for commercial, scientific and consumer applications, and leave photography to artists.
    jdef,
    I agree with your sentiments about the existence of an artistic void. I also think that digital technology is certainly more capable of improved artistic expression then traditional photography. More capable and more easily accomplished...no doubt about it for me, in my experience. I say this from the standpoint of not owning a digital camera.

    In my frame of reference the one thing that is missing in this digital equation is the practitioner his/her self. Whether this technology will be used to produce meaningful images remains to be seen. The capability to produce fresh improved artistic expression does not guarantee this result, in my opinion.

    When I say this I am speaking of images that are not improved images of what has gone before. What has been done and redone ad nauseum.

    I think that I have been fooling myself. But I don't think that I am alone in this position. The fact that a silver image has a supposed longer life or has a certain panache is of little meaningful consequence if the image produced has no genuine creative artistic impetus.

    I have gotten to a point that 99% of what I see is dull, boring, and uninspiring. That is true of my work and the work of others. I indicated to Lee Carmichael several weeks ago that I am sick to death of looking at pictures of things (people, places, buildings, peppers, Yosemite, mountains and the rest of that stuff) whether those are mine or others.

    This is my gut wrenching rant for this day. Good day to you.

  7. #27
    blansky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Wine country in Northern California
    Posts
    5,029
    Donald I hate to say this, but it looks like it is time for you to put your cameras away for a while.

    Book yourself a flight to some tropical destination, park your ass on the beach and reread Zen Mind Beginner Mind.

    You are burnnnnnned out. Classic case. Seen it a million times.

    The other thing is, pardon the expression, you need to get laid.

    You need an attitude adjustment and a change of perspective.

    It'll make things right again. You're just a little out of sync with the universe.


    It's a damn lucky thing I was able to hear your cry for help.


    I'll send you a bill for the advice when you get back. By the way, there is a money back guarantee.


    Later,

    Michael

  8. #28

    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    5,234
    Images
    9
    Donald

    I have gotten to a point that 99% of what I see is dull, boring, and uninspiring. That is true of my work and the work of others. I indicated to Lee Carmichael several weeks ago that I am sick to death of looking at pictures of things (people, places, buildings, peppers, Yosemite, mountains and the rest of that stuff) whether those are mine or others.
    This is too bad. Do you know anyone with a toddler? If so, follow them around for a few days. Try to see the world through their eyes. Maybe the newness of everything will wear off on you.

    Jdef

    I think the medium itself is stagnating and lacks any real visionaries. I think that realism, commercialism, and duplicability have had a moderating effect on photographers and photography.
    I don't get it? What would a real visionary accomplish? How have those three things moderated photographers and photography?
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  9. #29

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Düsseldorf, Germany
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    1,021
    Images
    1
    Look first for subject matter and balance and then look for print quality. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder n'est-ce pas?
    Francesco

  10. #30

    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Texas
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,576
    Images
    27
    The post from JDEF and Donald caught me by surprise...yet I think Michael is right - the word is 'BURN OUT'. At this point in time, I would say that there is very little art that is 'NEW' or 'Fresh' no matter what the medium. That being said, I would think that it is time for the darkroom to be shut down, cameras put away and the brain slipped into neutral -- at least as far as photography goes.

    Let's face it, if you aren't excited by what you do - why do it? If the day comes that I do not feel a little excitement when an image comes up in the developer, then maybe it will be time for me to listen to my own advice.

    You both have your opinion, and I respect it, but for now, I still love to 'See' - with or without a camera, so I will go out create new images for myself, and if someone else likes them great - if no one does, that's is OK too!

    Good Luck to both of you...give your 'Seeing Eye' a rest, maybe you can enjoy this again someday.
    Mike C

    Rambles

Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin