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Thread: Who are we?

  1. #11
    SchwinnParamount's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tkamiya View Post
    I am a software developer for a major software firm - that makes me an IT guy.

    I use both digital and film and I choose between the two depending on the purpose and my mood. If I have a job to do, such as shoot-this-or-that and in color, I use digital. If I'm in creative mood and want black and white, I use film. I like the exactness of digital and I like how few things are left to chance in B&W film and processing.

    I got into analog partly because I got tired of seeing equipment obsoleting so rapidly and new stuff coming out every few months. Also, I didn't like the fact digital media has such a narrow dynamic range. For some scenes, there isn't really a good way to capture the entire scene without blowing something. I also find, film work removed from everything else I do. Variety is nice sometimes. I find darkroom work relaxing and a place I can forget everything else.

    I am not a die-hard analog person. I find both enjoyable for different reasons.

    Oh, let's not forget... in film world, it's so much cheaper to fill one's GAS addiction....
    Yeah. Me too. My software company is one that everyone knows and loves and like it or not, we all use it's products. There are a few of us that are die-hard film users for the reasons you've stated.

    I find your reasons align very well with my own reasons.

  2. #12

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    I hope this won't be read as anti-digital slant or off topic but this "too much like work" thought hit me hard when I was stressing over calibration of my LCD monitor for digital color work. (which is a necessary task) I bought a wide gamut monitor, I bought a calibrator, and I was playing with printer profiles and soft proofing. Then I found my monitor wasn't backlit evenly. I have an especially hard to adjust image and I was trying to get it exactly like how I visualized it. Geez... this is way too much like work. I eventually got to a point I was satisfied with the result, and I'm glad.

    Few weeks later, I was in my darkroom and stressing over contrast and density. It was time consuming and somewhat tiring but for some reasons I found the process enjoyable if not relaxing. I came out thinking, "that was neat..."

    That spoke volume to me.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  3. #13
    njkphoto's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tkamiya View Post
    I hope this won't be read as anti-digital slant or off topic but this "too much like work" thought hit me hard when I was stressing over calibration of my LCD monitor for digital color work. (which is a necessary task) I bought a wide gamut monitor, I bought a calibrator, and I was playing with printer profiles and soft proofing. Then I found my monitor wasn't backlit evenly. I have an especially hard to adjust image and I was trying to get it exactly like how I visualized it. Geez... this is way too much like work. I eventually got to a point I was satisfied with the result, and I'm glad.
    I agree with you. The calibration of a monitor is a pain sometimes and still can't get perfect results all the time. Plus you are looking at a computer screen for a long times. For some reason you can't compare computer work with darkroom as the latter feels a lot better.

  4. #14
    SchwinnParamount's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by njkphoto View Post
    I agree with you. The calibration of a monitor is a pain sometimes and still can't get perfect results all the time. Plus you are looking at a computer screen for a long times. For some reason you can't compare computer work with darkroom as the latter feels a lot better.
    One of the really satisfying things about wet darkroom work is that it is so non-deterministic. That is, you repeat the same process twice in a row and your results are likely to be different. The challenge is in figuring out what the variables are and correcting them to get a pseudo repeatable process.

    Using my digi-cam, computer and printer is soooo boring. My results are determined by what buttons I click, sliders I slide, and spin boxes I set. Save my settings and I can make the same print over and over and over and over simply by pressing a print button. No challenge and dull dull dull.

    At work, this determinism is a great thing. It keeps bugs out of the software.

  5. #15
    Rick A's Avatar
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    I'm just a guy that loves the magic of it all. Since the age of (I cant remember exactly) 9 or 10, I've been facinated by the whole process. Maybe it was watching all the espionage movies, seeing the spy develope Minox film in a darkened room,doing the dip and dunk in a coffee cup(or something akin to one), had me hooked. Besides, I've always hung around "artists" and I cant draw, but I can carve(kinda), love to design furniture(and other large items)

    Rick

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by keithwms View Post
    IT people may simply be more comfortable with forum-based communication and hence may be slightly over-represented on forums like APUG.
    What he said. I know 10+ non-IT type film shooters in the New Haven area alone that would rather spend the time any other way than posting on internet forums. Plus these forums tend to be dominated by white English speaking males and really, who wants to be around that demographic all the time? Seriously, it gets boring fast.

    Regards, Art
    Visit my website at www.ArtLiem.com
    or my online portfolios at APUG and ModelMayhem

  7. #17
    mooseontheloose's Avatar
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    Plus these forums tend to be dominated by white English speaking males and really, who wants to be around that demographic all the time?

    Not sure I agree with that broad generalization.... ;-)

    Apuggers are my tribe -- I don't know anyone else who shoots film, although I garner quite a lot of respect from friends because of it. I'm definitely not in IT, not an artist (in the traditional sense), but I do love working with my hands, and the uniqueness of hand-crafted items (not just photographs). And, like some of the others have posted above, I've never been into chasing after the next great digital camera. It seems like once you get on that train that it's very hard to get off of it. I don't like the massive consumerism attached to that end of things. I get more bang for my buck with film and paper and chemicals (and occasional new GAS purchases) and I'm happiest when working in the darkroom.
    Rachelle

    My favorite thing is to go where I've never been. D. Arbus

  8. #18
    Marco B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SchwinnParamount View Post
    At work, this determinism is a great thing. It keeps bugs out of the software.
    Geeeeeh... now here is someone living in blissful heaven!

    Stay there, and make heavenly inspired fibre prints to show us all here on APUG! Don't touch earth ever again!
    My website

    "The nineteenth century began by believing that what was reasonable was true, and it wound up by believing that what it saw a photograph of, was true." - William M. Ivins Jr.

    "I don't know, maybe we should disinvent color, and we could just shoot Black & White." - David Burnett in 1978

    "Analog is chemistry + physics, digital is physics + math, which ones did you like most?"

  9. #19

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    I did some IT (or rather programming - i'm not an IT-er) at one time.
    It was rather non-deterministic though. And yes, that was what made it fun.

    However i did manage (as i'm sure all programmers did, and still do) to write the most deterministic program possible to write. All it did was quit immediately, i.e. nothing.
    There was a name for such a program, but what as it again?

  10. #20

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    I had what I consider an ultimate-film-experience today. A kind soul on APUG sent me a Kodak Autographic 3A to me. After looking at it for a while, I couldn't help myself to try it out. So I stuck a roll of Tmax100 in 120 format, used two dental floss container to hold it in the middle, then headed out. This is a camera from 1910s and 1920s. Absolutely no electronics. It is made of glass, steel, aluminum and wood.

    Took some random pictures in my neighborhood and came home. Went straight to darkroom, developed the film, then made contact sheets.

    How low tech can this get? But this IT guy who basically lives in UNIX world all day long writing C, PL/SQL, and Java code absolutely loved it. Perhaps it's because so different - but I didn't care. IT WAS FUN!

    If anyone's interested, see here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/tkamiya9
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

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