Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,837   Posts: 1,582,449   Online: 693
      
Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 54
  1. #11
    Mats_A's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Finland
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    571
    Images
    10
    Of course Mozart needed to practice. He also needed to be born in to the right family, place and time in history. And still:
    He often spent much time at the clavier, picking out thirds, which he was always striking, and his pleasure showed that it sounded good. [...] In the fourth year of his age his father, for a game as it were, began to teach him a few minuets and pieces at the clavier. [...] He could play it faultlessly and with the greatest delicacy, and keeping exactly in time. [...] At the age of five he was already composing little pieces, which he played to his father who wrote them down
    Some are Mozarts some not. All must practice.

    r

    Mats
    Digital is for communication, film is for documentation.


    http://www.flickr.com/photos/studiopirilo

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    16,878
    Images
    23
    some people are born with "it" whatever "it" may be ...
    i've got kids and i can see that they all have interests in different
    things ... and if nurtured those interests will turn into talent.

  3. #13
    Joe Lipka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Cary, North Carolina
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    809
    St. Ansel declared that he needed to make 10,000 negatives before he made good photographs. Granted, this was in the days of large format negatives where producing 10,000 negatives would be a considerable task. At that point, one would surely be a very technically competent creator of negatives. The question of what was on each negative is the more important question.

    I would assume that artistic ability falls under some form of "bell curve" for distribution in a population. If one recognizes ones' ability and pushes it through hard work, I would imagine one could improve beyond ones' natural ability. Likewise, we all mourn great talents that have squandered what they have been given.

    Yes, some skills are inborn, but those that work to develop them are better.
    Two New Projects! Light on China - 07/13/2014

    www.joelipkaphoto.com

    250+ posts and still blogging! "Postcards from the Creative Journey"

    http://blog.joelipkaphoto.com/

  4. #14
    clayne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    San Francisco, CA | Kuching, MY | Jakarta, ID
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,838
    Images
    57
    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Lipka View Post
    St. Ansel declared that he needed to make 10,000 negatives before he made good photographs. Granted, this was in the days of large format negatives where producing 10,000 negatives would be a considerable task. At that point, one would surely be a very technically competent creator of negatives. The question of what was on each negative is the more important question.
    I can't say that Adams never said this - but I thought the actual quote "Your first 10,000 photographs are your worst" was attributed to HCB?
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  5. #15
    AmsterdamMartin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Amsterdam, The Netherlands
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    79
    Images
    5
    Inborn talent exists, I believe.
    Some have more, others have less.
    Few have it all. The others just have to learn to work around it, if they are able to recognize it.
    But no matter what, it needs long hard work anyway.
    I know of a lot of talents in many fields gone waisted, because of lazyness, narcissism, war, drugs etc.
    Nothing comes for free.

    It is the same as luck. Everybody gets it. But what do you do when you find it. Do you see it ? do you use it and how ?
    A very untalented person can get his photographs into papers and exhibitions of the day.

    What is most important, in my view, is a combination of talents. Someone who has Adams-like talent but can't print or talk to people, goes along a different path.
    And Mozart had a short and maybe unhappy life, exploiting maximally his talent, while living 4 lives at once.
    He died in lonely poverty, but heralded in his own time and for centuries to come.
    Last edited by AmsterdamMartin; 04-11-2010 at 10:26 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #16
    Andrew Horodysky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Northern New Jersey
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    220
    I disagree with the quote. There's a consensus with many of the above posts, that "seeing" is learned, through practice. I believe -- together with other posters -- that everyone is born with innate talents; some come to realize which are to be nurtured and developed, others don't. But, just about everyone is born on an equal playing field. With any endeavor, creative or otherwise, one doesn't become proficient without practice, no matter with what they're born. So goes with music, writing, and the visual arts. When one works a craft/application hard enough, with certain determination -- through and through -- "talents" emerge.

    I'm not a big fan of "ivory tower" quotes and pompous declarations (even by practitioners I admire). God knows, there's plenty of that throughout history. Prove yourself -- with integrity and work, through your craft -- first, to yourself, then an audience.

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Wiltshire, UK
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    408
    Good thread and much to think about on a lazy Sunday afternoon...

    Don't know if it is really relevent but in sports one can see the naturally talented, the people who don't need to practice their skill - it just comes "naturally". In the UK, thinking of footballers such as Best, Gasgoine, Beckham. Their skill could be applied better through practice but other competent/good footballers would rarely get close to their skill level through practice.

    Does that relate to photographers? Not sure! The theory of visual design or technicalities of photography can be taught and generally understood by anybody - like the theory of kicking a ball but what elevates the technically perfect photo or visually "correct" image into something that "means" something to the viewer is, I believe, an inate sense of vision.
    Perhaps it is a case of knowing why the photo is taken rather than just here is a photo of "x". I have in mind a couple of photographers who shot a series on watertowers (don't recall their names) but the pictures seemed to be more than just a set of watertowers. Hmm, don't think I have answered the question or kept on point (!), oh dear..

  8. #18
    Lanline's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    143
    Images
    11
    In my case there are several things that I think helped my photography. The biggest think was to stop obsessing over camera gear. Shooting digital taught me that I needed to have every new camera because of the new upgrades: Number of pixels, bigger LCD, anti shake, wireless this and auto this. Finally, I shot a roll of film in a thrift store camera. Wow, I got great results. I started shooting more and more film and less digital. Then I stopped NEEDING gear. My most popular photo was shot last year with a FED2 rangefinder while I was out doing a test roll. I didn't have a light meter with me so I guessed.

    I turned my attention to seeing light and exposure, composition and every time I shot - I tried to avoid the mistakes that I made in the last roll.This has helped me to shoot better. I fire the shutter less often now. Most of the time I go with 12 shots on the roll. I wait for the moments that I want.

  9. #19
    swittmann's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Germany
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    156
    Images
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by Sim2 View Post
    I have in mind a couple of photographers who shot a series on watertowers (don't recall their names) but the pictures seemed to be more than just a set of watertowers.
    Bernd and Hilla Becher.

  10. #20
    markbarendt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Beaverton, OR, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,796
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    19
    Defining someone as talented is a purely subjective exercise.

    ------------------------------------

    Sorry to all you classical music lovers but Mozart, Bach, Beethoven, etcetera... suck. Their work, and almost all of their followers work, is truly boring. It may be technically astute but so what.

    Jimmy Buffet, Abba, Pick Floyd, the Beetles, and Olivia Newton John on the other hand... now we are talking talent.

    ------------------------------------

    Ansel is okay, I can learn lots about the craft from his work, but I'm not an F64 type of guy.

    Elliot Erwitt and HCB were, and Phil Borges, Joe McNally, and Jose Villa are more "talented", by my estimation, at creating engaging photos then Ansel ever was.

    ------------------------------------

    My point is that our preferences define who we each think has talent.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin