Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 76,264   Posts: 1,680,786   Online: 752
      
Page 4 of 8 FirstFirst 12345678 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 76
  1. #31
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,575
    Images
    6

    Art photography is a lost leader

    Quote Originally Posted by tlitody View Post
    If you look at the info at his site about commercial work you find that the majority of that was doing work for car manufacturers. That is what funded his personal work that most of us know him for.
    Could his commercial work be his bread and butter and his landscape photos are a lost leader? I know that sometimes, art directors use fine art photographers for a look instead of full time hired guns.

  2. #32

    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    188
    Quote Originally Posted by Mainecoonmaniac View Post
    Could his commercial work be his bread and butter and his landscape photos are a lost leader? I know that sometimes, art directors use fine art photographers for a look instead of full time hired guns.
    possibly but personally I don't think so. I suspect the first job for a car manufacturer got him the rest and he had an agent in london and probably elsewhere too.

  3. #33

    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Santa Cruz, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    167
    Images
    17
    Here is a business model to follow - Peter Lik

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/36670858/

    Gotta Love it

  4. #34

    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    188
    Quote Originally Posted by Mainecoonmaniac View Post
    Could his commercial work be his bread and butter and his landscape photos are a lost leader? I know that sometimes, art directors use fine art photographers for a look instead of full time hired guns.
    Actually if you look at the models in those car adds they are mostly fairly old. I suspect he makes plenty out of print sales these days.

  5. #35
    patrickjames's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    743
    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    And even so, they do a lot of other business on the side with their Lodima press, selling Lodima paper and archival products, as well as giving work shops. So their revenue is most certainly not prints only.

    But that just proves the point. You would have to be Michael Kenna or Alec Soth to be able to make a living off of the photography part of it only.
    To even further burst your bubble, both Kenna and Soth do work on the side. Making 100% of your income from landscape photography just does not happen. The old saying is if you want to make a small fortune at photography start with a large one.

    I don't know how good of a photographer you are, but don't quit your day job unless you are independently wealthy. If you love doing photography though, keep doing it. No one can take that away from you.

  6. #36
    Vaughn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Humboldt Co.
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    4,975
    Images
    40
    Somewhere along the way I became a "professional photographer" for income tax reasons, and many of my habits lent in that direction. But instead of a goal of supporting myself fully from my landscape photography, I opted for living, as an artist, a life of photography. Raising a set of triplet boys (now 13-yrs old) influences that "life of photography" a bit, but working halftime as the university's darkroom tech keeps me centered. A lot of good students pass through the program...and since I am not a professor, I tend to work with students who come to me for help or to bounce ideas off of. It keeps photography fresh. Finding images and making prints are my primary focus, but I like the balance I have struck.

    Giving workshops reminds me of my years building and maintaining wilderness trails. Up at first light, turn the mules out to graze, get the fire going for coffee and breakfast. Work for 8 or so hours with pickaxes, crosscut saws, McLeods, shovels, Polaskis, pack saddles, and mule-headed mules -- then make camp, turn the mules loose again to graze, get a fire going, cook dinner, and wash the dishes just before the sun sets. A long day, but a lot got done. It is satisfying work and at the end of the day, one can turn around and see the progress and achievements of the day. And I will no more be rich from giving workshops than I would by packing mules and building trails. But they are enjoyable ways to live, and in both cases one works hard -- both are worthwhile work, and worthwhile things are worth doing well.

    My present circumstances dictate that I increase the amount that photography contributes to my overall income. Fortunately, those present circumstances also have given me every other week to concentrate on my photography. For the last 4 months I have been able to add (after expenses) about 50 percent more to my usual take-home pay through workshops and print sales. I do not expect to keep that up, but I won't complain if I do.

    Like they say, it is not just the destination, but also the journey that is important. So I figure a job/profession is not just the path to retirement.

    Vaughn
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  7. #37
    eclarke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    New Berlin, Wi
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    1,972
    Images
    71
    Quote Originally Posted by wclark5179 View Post
    "Like you I am semi retired..."

    Yes, I'm trying to be semi-retired but I get calls quite a lot to do stuff.

    The wedding I did Saturday June 26 was wonderful. Previously, I did the brides sisters wedding & the grooms brothers wedding. There are a couple more siblings to get married.

    I only have a web site left for advertising so I'm trying to taper off. Already have a couple of other gigs scheduled! Still love the business. My associate photographer is 63 (I'm 62) and we decided we would like to do this at least another ten years!

    If people still like what photos I make then I'm up for it! I've always said beauty is in the eyes of the checkbook holder!

    Thanks for your thoughts.

    This is a nice place!
    Wedding photography, a different thing from landscape photography, the OP's premise...Evan Clarke

  8. #38
    eclarke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    New Berlin, Wi
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    1,972
    Images
    71
    "But I've also met photographers that take their own pictures, print them, frame them in cheezy frames, and sell them at local markets for say $100 for a 20x24. And they are there, year after year with a big pile of cash in their pocket." I've been attending art fairs for decades and really suspect a lot of the "photographers" are selling stock that they have purchased, see the same photos too many different places. Better to take up a sure fire career like rock music or football star than landscape photography. Once you start trying to make a living from art, it's just a product and there's a LOT of this product out there, better to sell something else...EC

  9. #39
    wclark5179's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    503
    "Wedding photography, a different thing from landscape photography, the OP's premise...Evan Clarke"

    I make landscape photographs at every wedding. I think they're called environmental photographs. I get to some pretty beautiful places. Many weddings today take place at venues other than a church. Some even in a beautiful location that would make into some nice landscape photographs! It's that I have people in my landscapes and I'm hired to make the photographs!

    At any rate, you are correct, the thread was started on the premise of landscape photography, most likely w/o people in them but I don't know for sure. I point out what I do as I've made some money doing what I do. Wasn't that a consideration of the OP's?
    Bill Clark

  10. #40

    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    188
    Word is that its getting much much harder to make money doing wedding photography. Digital has made it far easier and much much cheaper to produce prints and an amateur can do a basic job that cheapskate brides are happy with. And Brides demand a CD with full res images so you get no reprint work. Same with Landscape. Everyone has a digital camera that does an OK job producing keep sake photos. So its only the super high quality prints that very few people are actually prepared to pay for. The market has changed drastically over the last 10 years. People are producing inkjet landscapes just because they can do it cheaply and the punters know it costs nothing because they can get reasonable quality prints themselves from the online print services even if the photography isn't too good.
    Last edited by tlitody; 06-29-2010 at 01:17 PM. Click to view previous post history.

Page 4 of 8 FirstFirst 12345678 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin