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  1. #31
    Alistair Wait's Avatar
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    Almost 25 years ago I was asked to take photographs for the funeral of a 5 month old baby who passed away unexpectedly. The parents were close friends and I spent time with them taking photographs on a number of occasions between the child's death and the burial. It is one of the the most moving experiences I have ever had, and one I will always treasure.

    From my own experience, I suggest that if you are invited to be a part of such an special and intimate moment, you will receive so much more in return than you could ever give.

  2. #32
    Marco B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bdial View Post
    It's not a new thing, tintype death portraits of infants are common.

    If the photographer has the skill to pull it off, why not? If it helps the parents through a very difficult situation, it's a good thing.
    Quote Originally Posted by railwayman3 View Post
    Similar photos of infants (and, to a lesser extent, even of adults) were not unusual in Victorian times. They may seem rather strange to present-day sensitivities, but times and circumstances were very different then, and if the pictures helped in grieving.......
    This tradition is even older than that. There are 17th century paintings of deceased baby's. Also, it was very common for families to have family portrait paintings with children that died either included as little angles floating in the sky, or pictured as living children but usually set apart from the rest of the group to signify their death.

    Marco
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    "The nineteenth century began by believing that what was reasonable was true, and it wound up by believing that what it saw a photograph of, was true." - William M. Ivins Jr.

    "I don't know, maybe we should disinvent color, and we could just shoot Black & White." - David Burnett in 1978

    "Analog is chemistry + physics, digital is physics + math, which ones did you like most?"

  3. #33
    Rudeofus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew K View Post
    Also - I've done a little wet plate/tintype photography - exposures were not in the 10-15 minute range - using an old camera of the period in daylight you are talking at most a 3-8 second exposure...by the late 1880's exposures in a studio were down to 1-3 seconds with wet plates based on contemporary accounts...
    I have no experience with these materials. I was told about these death portraits and the reason for doing them in a funeral museum (yes, there is such a museum in Vienna). I don't remember when this was common so I don't know what kind of film material was available then. Also, the portraits I saw in that museum were indoor, so exposure times must have been much longer.

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