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  1. #21
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    I had Mom hold the dog.


    Even then, I only had 0.68 seconds to make the shot. It came out sharp enough for a 4x5 print but only just barely passable for an 8x10.
    (That dog is only 4 months old but she's like lightning!)

    Regardless, this is a prime example of what I'm talking about. Mom's holding her dog and looking at the dog, not the camera.
    That was the 11th shot on a 12 exposure roll of film. I shot one more (out of focus ) then had to switch to the Pentax 35mm. I got several of them that were 100% in focus but every one of them looked stiff.

    No! I did NOT say, "Okay Mom, let's put the dog back on your lap so I can take another picture..."

    And, another thing! Shooting with a completely manual, meterless camera really teaches you how to be a photographer! You've got to have the camera in one hand, the meter in the other and you've got to do everything while looking down at a viewfinder that shows everything backwards! You're keeping one eye on the camera and the other eye on the subject. It can start to feel really intense!
    When I finally started using the other camera everything was a lot easier.

    It seems counter intuitive that people act more relaxed when I'm all jazzed up and they are all jazzed up when I'm more relaxed. Maybe the photographer's attitude translates differently?
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

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    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  2. #22
    Rick A's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Worker 11811 View Post
    I had Mom hold the dog.


    Even then, I only had 0.68 seconds to make the shot. It came out sharp enough for a 4x5 print but only just barely passable for an 8x10.
    (That dog is only 4 months old but she's like lightning!)

    Regardless, this is a prime example of what I'm talking about. Mom's holding her dog and looking at the dog, not the camera.
    That was the 11th shot on a 12 exposure roll of film. I shot one more (out of focus ) then had to switch to the Pentax 35mm. I got several of them that were 100% in focus but every one of them looked stiff.

    No! I did NOT say, "Okay Mom, let's put the dog back on your lap so I can take another picture..."

    And, another thing! Shooting with a completely manual, meterless camera really teaches you how to be a photographer! You've got to have the camera in one hand, the meter in the other and you've got to do everything while looking down at a viewfinder that shows everything backwards! You're keeping one eye on the camera and the other eye on the subject. It can start to feel really intense!
    When I finally started using the other camera everything was a lot easier.

    It seems counter intuitive that people act more relaxed when I'm all jazzed up and they are all jazzed up when I'm more relaxed. Maybe the photographer's attitude translates differently?
    I learned to shoot with an Argus C-3 brick and NO light meter before I graduated to a Yashica D then eventually bought a Gossen light meter to go with it. You learn to read the light very quickly that way. I still take my cameras out without a light meter, or take a quick reading then work off that for a while before I take another. Most of the time I dont turn the meter on with my OM-1(OK, so I forget to turn it on).
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum

  3. #23
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    I like the fact that the aperture dial has no click stops. I've developed the habit of keeping my finger near the dial so I can subtly tweak that dial between shots. It will take a while to develop the eye to do it accurately but I can understand the process.

    I have always had a hard time keeping the camera in focus. I don't know why. I can focus a movie projector razor sharp.
    My trick has always been to go one ƒ-stop wider than I think I need and compensate with the shutter speed. That gives me a little headroom for focusing. When I have an aperture-priority camera it's easy. With a full-manual camera, I have not been so successful.

    I think my main problem is that I'll set the camera exposure and focus the image then, at the last second, I'll recompose the shot but either forget to refocus or do it hastily.

    So, basically, this Yashica is slapping me upside the head, so to speak!
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

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    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  4. #24
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    Indeed. I've mostly shot with my 124G since March, and the response has been way better. Either the person knows what it is and strikes up a good conversation, or else they're not sure what it is that I'm holding and don't except a picture.
    Gear: Camera, Brain, Light.
    Website - FB

  5. #25

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    i was using my graflex slr with a brass lens on it a few weeks ago
    and a 6 +/- year old kid came up to me as i was leaving and said : nice camera.
    using an old clunker like that usually puts a smile on people's faces, and when
    i say: have a look through the camera, they get kind of giddy.
    silver magnets, trickle tanks sold
    artwork often times sold for charity
    PM me for details

  6. #26
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    One time, a few years back in Yosemite at Wawona Tunnel whlie walking towards the overlook I was passed by a nice looking Japaness gentleman walking the other direction. As he he he passed by, I heard him mutter, "Hassleblad, very nice." and kept on walking. No eye contact. No other comments. I was amazed. And gratified.
    Logan

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by whlogan View Post
    ...I heard him mutter, "Hassleblad, very nice." and kept on walking. No eye contact. No other comments. I was amazed. And gratified.
    Logan
    That's the kind of recognition that, I think, is most important.

    A general understanding that "Hasseleblad" = "very nice" but the person is polite enough to recognize that fact without unduly troubling the possessor of said Hasselblad.

    In other words, I think it is important that people recognize well made, precision instruments and the people who take such pride in their work to use them but who are polite enough to understand that other people deserve to proceed in their lives without being unduly hassled by people they don't know.

    There are some places I like to go that are frequented by many photographers like parks, etc. If I was walking along and noticed somebody with a vintage Halleslblad I might say, "Nice camera!" and give them a thumbs-up as I passed by but I would simply leave it at that unless I thought the person was open to conversation.

    The average stereotypical Japanese man is so polite, almost to a fault, that making such a comment which another might hear him say would be quite a compliment to be spoken in the company of a stranger.

    If I was in your place it would have been a very good day, indeed!
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

    -----

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  8. #28
    tac
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    My guess as to what is going on here is that a person photographing me with an "old" tlr is obviously a "hobbyist" and I'm honored that he or she would feel that I was photogenic enough to waste film on, whereas a guy/woman with a sleek, modern looking camera is likely an FBI agent, whom I do not want photographing me, even though I haven't done anything! I swear! No, really!

  9. #29

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    The reaction to TLRs has been extremely beneficial. People either ignore them entirely or are interested. I've taken shots I wouldn't have even attempted with a SLR for fear of peoples reactions. For example, a young girl was watching a parade with her parents. I hung out for 3 minutes or so taking shot from about 4 feet behind them, obviously photographing her. The parents talked with each other about the camera, old film, etc and smiled when I glanced at them.

    The reaction to folding cameras has been more interesting. People really notice the Mockba-5 - some are fine with it, some seem a little intimidated to have it pointed at them. I have yet to have a negative reaction to the smaller Zenobia. In fact, I haven't had a reaction at all. No comments, no unease, its been a little odd.

    The Leica IIIc... similar to the Zenobia with a big exception. Photographers and others come up to me all the time to talk about the camera, talk about the gear they have at home, waiting for use when they retire, etc. It actually has been detrimental to shooting - too many conversations at times.

    The compact rangefinders - Canonets, etc - get frankly odd reactions. I've been approached twice by Frenchmen asking about buying the camera. I was once shooting at a market when a girl quickly took of her shirt to try one on. I didn't take any shots but a photographer with an SLR took a few quick shots and moved on. The girl muttered under her breath about photographers and pointed out the photographer to her friends. He happened to be right behind me. She quick smiled at me and said 'Oh, no, you, you're shooting film. Its fine'.

  10. #30
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Legge View Post
    ...She quick smiled at me and said 'Oh, no, you, you're shooting film. Its fine'.
    Intersting!

    So, then, to paraphrase...

    Digital = Internet.

    AND

    Internet = Porn.

    THEREFORE she didn't like her picture being on the internet, used for porn and she would, understandably, be upset.

    BUT

    Film = Art.

    THEREFORE she didn't mind her picture being taken even though every other part of the circumstance was exactly the same.

    The ARTIST somehow makes her feel worthy of being photographed whereas the DIGITAL camera makes her feel like a commodity. Her reaction varies accordingly.
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

    -----

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

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