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  1. #1
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    People's response to your camera.

    Yes, rapport between the photographer and his subjects is important but I noticed that people seem to react differently when the photographer uses a different camera.

    I went for a ride in the car with my wife and her mother. I picked up my 35mm camera as I was going out the door. Then I got a wild hair up my ass and grabbed the Yashica-Mat.

    We stopped the car at a roadside ice cream stand and me my wife, her mom and Mom's dog sat at a picnic table enjoying our evening snack. I left the 35mm in the car and cranked up the Yashica.

    I got several really nice shots with the Yashica but I quickly finished the roll. I didn't really feel like changing the film outdoors in the sun so I put the Yashica away and grabbed the Pentax.

    It was the same people people in the same place, same setting, same everything except the camera.

    I just looked at both sets of negatives. I got four nice photos of people smiling and acting natural on the roll of 120 but I might have got one half-decent shot on the 35mm. People seemed more uptight and less relaxed when I shot them with the 35.

    Do you think people get some kind of "in your face" feeling when you shoot them with a 35mm SLR versus a TLR? You aren't looking directly at people when you use the TLR at waist or chest level like you are when use bring an SLR up to your face to shoot a picture.

    This was only the fourth roll of film I have ever shot with anything other than a traditional looking camera like an SLR or an instamatic.
    I'm going to have to think about this some more. It'll be a good excuse to shoot a few more rolls in the name of science. Don't you think?

    Regardless, this will affect how I think when I am choosing which camera to use for the day.
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

    -----

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  2. #2
    Ektagraphic's Avatar
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    When I have been out and about with the Rolleiflex, I have gotten an increadable number of people that stop to comment about it, and yes, plenty did not even know film was still available. I also have had quite a few people tell me that they have not one but two of them at home from their father or someone like that. The last few times I have been shooting that any people were around, it seems like atleast one person an hour has commented...I am just getting into portraits and I have felt that working with a TLR gives smoother communication with your subject since your face isn't smashed up against the camera most of the time.....
    Helping to save analog photography one exposure at a time

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ektagraphic View Post
    When I have been out and about with the Rolleiflex, I have gotten an increadable number of people that stop to comment about it, and yes, plenty did not even know film was still available. I also have had quite a few people tell me that they have not one but two of them at home from their father or someone like that.
    Same response here but with a Rolleicord
    Bachelor of Fine Arts and Bachelor of Arts: Journalism - University of Arkansas 2014

    Canon A-1, Canon AE-1, Canon Canonet GIII 17, Argus 21, Rolleicord Va, Mamiya RB67, Voigtländer Bessa

    http://darkroom317.deviantart.com/

  4. #4

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    actually it's the waist level finder... I have the same reactions to an RB67
    * Just because your eyes are closed, doesn't mean the lights in the darkroom are off. *
    * When the film you put in the camera is worth more than the camera you put the film in... *
    * When I started using 8x10, it amazed me how many shots were close to the car. *

  5. #5
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    I've had great response with my Yashicamat particularly in Venice, quite a few Italians commented on it.

    But even greater response when shooting LF, from all age groups. Great for getting people talking.

    Ian

  6. #6

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    I think that it is two things- the TLR 'cute' factor, and the waist level finder. The TLR box looks benign, no big hunk of glass pointing at you.

    I'd agree with Jeff more, though, about the waist level finder. I think it is because both you and the subject are having a 'common experience' of staring at the same thing. They see you looking at something, not looking at them directly.

  7. #7
    munz6869's Avatar
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    Agree with these comments - currently stomping 'round Europe with Rolleiflex & Wista and have had lots of interest! I've always experienced "warmer" people photos with the Rollei - and they are also (I have inadvertantly discovered) great for dog photos - probably because you're looking down, which is not threatening.

    Marc!

  8. #8

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    I shoot with a few different cameras all with different results. I get great reactions with my Kodak Stereo camera even thought it is mashed against my face when I shoot, and I use flashbulbs that are just a little dimmer than the surface of the sun, people produce genuine smiles at it. My Kodak Autographic bellows type Brownies gather a lot of looks and comments as well, along with great smiles and lots of questions. My Pentax 6X7 gets a lot of comments, but with it looking like an SLR on steroids I notice a less attention. My Nikon SLR's just get yeah whatever like if I was using a digital pocket point and shoot type of reactions. I think that is why my Kodaks that I regard as simply "snap shot" cameras produce better photos, it has more to do with reaction to the camera than my ability to use it. I don't really notice too much guarded behavior, but I tend to not break out the cameras when there are a lot of children I don't know around, unless it's someplace like Disney World where everyone has a camera of some sort.

  9. #9
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    When I step out of my go-kart with 'Brutus' under my arm, it's always two-steps back and stare, and stare and stare... Is a film camera viewed as threatening? It's just stares. Today a small coastal town's cake shop customers did just that, eyeballing me up and down and craning for a look at the camera (removed from the car for security, not that I was going to use it on the street). I only went in for a donut, not a heap of up-close-and-personal attention. The back of Brutus (EOS1N) is clearly visible and speaks unambiguously of "film": there is of course no digi monitor or cheap plastic dials or "Canon EOS Digital" on the all-black strap. Then a dredlocked surfie pulled up beside me: "You a photographer, mate?". Said "no, just a customer waiting to buy a donut!".

    Got my donut, paid the $2.00, turned around and left, with people still staring at me as I went through the door. If I take a small digi compact in there on the next stopover, will I get the same attention? :rolleyes:

    On a related matter, my clients who have purchased Ilfochromes enjoy seeing the original Velvia trannies on the lightbox. I have trained them to eyeball the trannies with a loupé and take the time to explain what production of an Ilfochrome involves and what happens after printing (matting, wrapping, inspection then framing). So an effective, well-refined rapport with clients, right from the start, is vital. Most clients do not trust digital or have a poor understanding of the relationship between the electronic image, printing and a perception that other printing methods will not last like Ilfochromes. And that's what I am at pains to explain.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  10. #10
    alexmacphee's Avatar
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    I get the same with old box cameras and folders. When I'm using them, it makes me remember my dad and how he would take us to the park on Sunday afternoons to play, and have our pictures taken. I think these cameras tap into pleasant memories and nostalgia. Whether a D70 or an EOS 1Ds will ever have the same associations, I'm not so sure.
    Alex

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