Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 73,665   Posts: 1,623,958   Online: 738
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 22
  1. #11
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    13,387
    Images
    60
    Quote Originally Posted by jmcd View Post
    It's great that others have liked your photos so much that they have made a point of saying so—really, that is a very good thing.

    But it should not influence what you think of your photos.
    One of the reasons I take photographs is that photography is a method of communication. If I want to be effective in that method, it behoves me to pay attention to how others react to what I do.

    So to that extent I think it is helpful to know what others think about what I do, and it isn't inappropriate to have that influence what I think.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  2. #12
    phaedrus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Waltershausen, Thuringia, Germany
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    463
    Images
    11
    Quote Originally Posted by IloveTLRs View Post
    I'm not 100% satisfied with photos that are "nice"; I would rather have people think "WOW, that is fantastic". I spend a lot of time on Flickr (uploading & looking) - I've seen so many amazing photos (film, naturally) that I look up to. I can't help sometimes thinking "Why can't I take photos like that?" or "Why can't I see things like that?" Sometimes it's a great motivator, sometimes it's discouraging.
    Well, not to put a too fine point to it, but what you're charging after is more of a cliché.
    If you get this "nice" reaction from people for your landscape photos it's because they satisfy their expectations which other photographers and the media (N.G., nature series on TV and so on) have shaped. Their own holiday photos can't satisfy this expectation because they're confused about their purpose and make journal photos instead of landscape photos. One photo can't be good in both categories!
    Anyway, If you want to get a "WOW, that is fantastic" reaction from this clientele, you'll need to set dial to eleven, so to speak. Up the saturation, include picturesque elements, take sunset shots. Avoid being subtle.
    Not my cup of tea, obviously. I had thought that with PIZZAZ you meant elements of photos that speak to your viewers, that shake them up and provoke a reaction. The key here is content. Show something that is controversial or out of it's usual context. Something unexpected, looking gross and beautiful at the same time.
    Of course, you're going to get as many rejections as accolades. That's the nature of things.

  3. #13
    phaedrus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Waltershausen, Thuringia, Germany
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    463
    Images
    11
    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    No necessarily so. It can mean adding a little more impact to the print. Ansel Adams did this, so when he did it would you say that what he did was trite or done to "shake them up and provoke a reaction"? He is not the only one that did that, just one example. Are you are injecting you own agenda it the thread?

    Steve
    I'd call it a point of view instead of an agenda.
    Interesting point you raise about A.A.. He was original at his time, certainly not trite. And he was a great teacher, you still can learn excellent b&w technique from him today.
    I don't think he was out to shake things up and the reaction he continues to provoke in viewers of his works is awe in front of the wonders of nature and an understanding that it needs to be preserved. He did this very well, thus abolishing the need to repeat it in his way. Trying to replicate his photos, one would be unoriginal and ill-advised today. But of course it can and will be done and might lead to personal satisfaction and commercial success.
    No one needs my permission to choose either way.

  4. #14
    Nikanon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    343
    Why do you care what anyone else has to say or think about your images? I find one of the differences in many film and digital shooters is that the film shooters shoot entirely for themselves while digital shooters are shooting to impress people. Do you do photography for the sake of others, or do you do it because it is your passion? There is nothing that is any more of yourself that can come from any one of us. Maybe you need to stop thinking of your viewer and start thinking for your own values in your images, and start achieving them.

    Nikanon

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    10
    Seeing photographically is about asking questions. The first question should be what attracts me to this scene enough to want me to photograph it? What is the main element of the scene that makes me want to photograph it? How do I make the main element the main element in my photograph with the tools and techniques at my disposal? Is this the only way of seeing this scene? Is there a better angle or approach? And because we all take pictures to communicate: will anyone else care or get the intent of what I am photographing?
    These are the major elements of my though process as I'm making photographs. Of course, all kinds of small technical details are working away in the background (which comes through much practice to remove from the foreground of thought).
    I don't agree with the school of thought that everyone be damned because I shoot for myself and if nobody else appreciates my photos than too bad. We are visual communicators and if nobody is looking at our photographs than what is the purpose of continuing photography. This doesn't mean you have to be hanging in MOMA. Having family and friends appreciate your photography may be enough. For others, MOMA is enough.
    What I think Nikanon is eluding to is integrity. We shouldn't be chasing down every fade (hello HDR) because we think it will get us noticed. But critically listening to viewers as you are doing is needed in order to grow and become a better communicator.

  6. #16
    Erik Petersson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Stockholm, Sweden
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    648
    Images
    8
    Quote Originally Posted by tomalophicon View Post
    The things I try to observe before taking any photographs are:

    What is it? Why am I looking at it? Why put it into a photograph?
    AND: KEEP IT SIMPLE!
    You are dissatisfied with the photos you are making today. This is good for you, because it gives you desire and energy to practice, practice and practice.

    Also, follow the above advice, which is excellent.

  7. #17
    juan's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    St. Simons Island, Georgia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,646
    Images
    4
    When I was a member of a camera club, I learned from a PSA judge that making a great photo is as simple as having someone wearing a red jacket stand in the background. This is the same judge who could not understand why a black and white slide had no color.

    Don't let others dictate your view of your own work. Unless, of course, you are working for a commercial client.
    juan

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Midlands, UK
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    920
    You don't like your photos being dubbed as postcard worthy, so I'm guessing you consider photography an art form. Good start.
    I really hope this doesn't seem harsh, but the photos you've attached are closer to holiday snapshots than fine art. I think you really need to get some photography books and study photographs and think more intelligently about composition and lighting. My photographs aren't brilliant, mediocre at best, but spending as much (if not more) time looking at images and figuring out why they work, why they grab my attention, why they make me think, I'm taking much better photographs than I would if I shot more than I studied. The images you've attached are very... illustrative, if that's a word to use. They don't convey anything, they have no mood, drama, mystery, subtlety or real beauty even though I'm sure these are gorgeous locations.

    You could start by going out and composing 80/20 and using the rule of thirds. As simple as that stuff is, you'll soon discover how powerful thoughtful composition is, but think about light first and foremost.

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Midlands, UK
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    920
    Also, what the hell is 'PIZZAS'?

  10. #20
    Akki14's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    London, UK
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,873
    Images
    210

    http://www.whattheduck.net/strip/761

    Learn editing out your crap photos. Try out different styles so you can find your own. And sometimes the best form of photography involves waiting for the right moment and involves NOT taking a picture. That's editing too.

    and I'm all out of clichés. Good Luck.
    ~Heather
    oooh shiny!
    http://www.stargazy.org/

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin