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  1. #21
    jamesgignac's Avatar
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    This is done all of the time in many art schools (believe me, I've been to a few) and it's not cheating in any way - please go ahead. Image creation is what it is - there are never any rules so it's impossible to cheat.
    -dereck|james|gignac
    dereckjamesgignac.com

  2. #22
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    David Hockney produced an interesting TV programme and a book about the use of the lucida in art and showed several examples where he thinks a lucida was used by the artist. Some of these examples show that the artist moved the device around to paint different parts of a scene which in some cases created some odd perspectives and the occasional arm or leg which did not look possible or to scale.


    Steve.
    Last edited by Steve Smith; 10-21-2010 at 07:12 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  3. #23

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    It has been stated, and supported by research that the great Leonardo da Vinci used this tecnique! If anyone running a art clas has a problem with that, remind them that Leonardo is the all times best artist -and engineer ans sci-fi writer that ever lived - by far!

    It has also been suggested that Leonardo was able to make photograps with his camera, by some kind of tar process I'm told, but was not able to fix the images, wasn't it Talbot who did that? (Daguerre was on a totally different track with a process that would have been banned today within minutes, utilizing mercury vapors.....)

    To my mind, using a camera obscura would actually enhance a drawing class, since it frees one from mundane tasks, allowing more time on the details, and the details is what matters in drawings.

    Compare this to a class in math, 15 years ago calculators was banned, and the pupils had to climbe ever mountain in the learning process by hand. Today they all use calculators leaping by bounds from peak to peak in the process.
    Its not comparable, they don't learn to do small change in their head, but really no nedd to since the change comes up automagically on a screen at counter!

    I'd say go for camera obscura and revolutionze drawing class!

    If I had one of those new desk-screens, i'd pick up drawing & painting in a minute! The end result is NOT a photograph.

  4. #24
    JDP
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    What you may find, in any case, is that once you have traced out many images from projected photographs, you will be able to do the same free-hand anyway. It is a great aid to learning to draw/paint perspective properly. As has been said many famous artists did this and the influence of photography on fine art is very apparrent after 1850 (at least in Europe).

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by Erik Prestmo View Post
    Leonardo is the all times best artist...by far!
    I've always thought Caspar Friedrich was the all time best artist





    Quote Originally Posted by JDP View Post
    What you may find, in any case, is that once you have traced out many images from projected photographs, you will be able to do the same free-hand anyway.
    That's a possibility that's crossed my mind, and I will do that if I need to.




    I did try tracing a slide for practice last night on a sheet from a sketch pad . I got the outlines traced; all that's left, I guess, is to add shading and fill in some details
    "I have captured the light and arrested its flight! The sun itself shall draw my pictures!"

    -Louis Daguerre, 1839-

  6. #26

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    If you want to know how to draw look at Rembrandt, not a viewfinder.
    http://www.rembrandtpainting.net/rem...ings_start.htm

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by blockend View Post
    Drawings from photographs tend to lack the slight binocular distortions and visceral response to 3-dimensional objects in space that make drawing from life so compelling.
    wouldnt a photographic print have the same drawbacks? Or would the enlarger lens somehow cancel out distortions of the camera lens? (No sarcasm intended here. That's a real question, because I dont know )




    Quote Originally Posted by blockend View Post
    If you want to know how to draw look at Rembrandt, not a viewfinder.
    http://www.rembrandtpainting.net/rem...ings_start.htm
    Thanks for the link. I'm a fan of Rembrandt


    I did attempt to make a sketch on a 9x12 sketchpad sheet. I had some pvc pipe laying around, so I made a big easel type structure and attached a sheet of foam board to it and then taped the sheet to the foam board. Then I tilted my enlarger to the vertical position and aligned the board as good as I could to the enlarger lens with my laser aligner thing. I made a vine charcoal sketch; I couldnt do much detil because the "easel" was kinda wobbly. The charcoal sketch has an Edgar Degas look to it, which is fine by me since I like Degas. The whole process was a lot of trouble, though, and I think I might be better off using prints as a guide instead of tracing.

    BTW, I used the pvc pipe easel so I could project the image bigger. I wanted to do a little cropping, and I thought the bigger image would make it easier to trace since I could better see the details. In reality, the light falloff made the details harder to see than the smaller image projected on the baseboard
    "I have captured the light and arrested its flight! The sun itself shall draw my pictures!"

    -Louis Daguerre, 1839-

  8. #28
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    "What you may find, in any case, is that once you have traced out many images from projected photographs, you will be able to do the same free-hand anyway."

    -Thats not always the case. That all depends on whether you are inciteful enough to -understand- what you are copying. For instance, a child will draw a house with squares and triangles. But when you understand how perspective distorts the lines, you can draw a realistic building with nonparallel lines. The same goes for people. If you copy an image you may not understand the proportions of the face vs. the head. Anatomy classes can be very helpful in understanding the bones and muscles under the skin.
    Go not to the elves for counsel, for they will say both yes and no.

  9. #29
    darinwc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by blockend View Post
    Hyper-realist enthusiasts in the 1970s exactly reproduced colour transparencies on large canvases, it turned out to be a visual dead-end. Drawings from photographs tend to lack the slight binocular distortions and visceral response to 3-dimensional objects in space that make drawing from life so compelling.
    Eh? I call bull-puckey. Any 2-dimensional drawing is going to look the same with one eye or two.The real reason they never succeeded was 1. their work was boring and soul-less. 2. people expect a painting to look like a painting, not a photograph.
    Go not to the elves for counsel, for they will say both yes and no.

  10. #30
    darinwc's Avatar
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    ..Just had a funny thought. what if you used a holga image as the basis for your drawing...
    Go not to the elves for counsel, for they will say both yes and no.

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