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  1. #11
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    One trending that I've been seeing in exhibitions are ink jet prints that are poster size that not mounted or not in a frame. I usually walk away from those shows feeling ambivalent about the presentation. I seen one in Chicago a few years back. The museum just used push pins on the wall and the prints are held by binder clips. To me, it just devalues the art. I'm pretty old school of presenting prints in frames and an over mat that is neutral white or slightly warmer that is archival. The more spartan presentations is like cooking a fine meal with great ingredients then serving it on a paper plate. That's my thought.

  2. #12
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    The presentation should be relative to your standards and your pride in the work. I saw one of these push pin shows just last week, the worst display of photography ever...EC

  3. #13
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eclarke View Post
    The presentation should be relative to your standards and your pride in the work. I saw one of these push pin shows just last week, the worst display of photography ever...EC
    My question is the presentation of your work shows how the artist value his or her work?

  4. #14

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    From numerous photography exhibitions attended since the 1970s I can't recall a typical size for a framed print. My guess is an image around 10 x 15" from a fine 35mm negative. Is that correct?

  5. #15

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    i seem to remember the starn twins displaying photographs
    that were held together with tape ...

    you should display work the way you want to.
    if my apug gallery looks empty you might check these places

    website
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  6. #16
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mainecoonmaniac View Post
    My question is the presentation of your work shows how the artist value his or her work?


    He she should value all the effort and finished product very highly, not treat it as an after-thought.

    Don't do it cheaply but show visible signs that you really care about the quality of your work and ensure it lasts and lasts. The print, as well as the frame-up, should last several long lifetimes.

    IKEA frames are OK for non-exhibition and personal work; exhibitions however, in galleries, often specify how work is to be presented in terms of framing (but this is not globally so).

    My worksheet for a 30x45cm Ilfochrome is print $120.00; mat (Crescent Cotton 9-ply Rag mat 9-ply, frame (Burke ebony) and glass (TruVue UV-retardant) $200 = $320.00 (66x52cm finished frame). From the outset I made a declaration of bespoke craftsmanship that is guaranteed to last, unlike inkjet prints (which incidentally doesn't have a place on APUG, being analogous).

    On printing, a photographer and his printer as separate operating entities can be a magical and very successful partnership. I've put my trust in three Master Printers over 17 years and never once have had cause to debate the finished product.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  7. #17
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by blockend View Post
    From numerous photography exhibitions attended since the 1970s I can't recall a typical size for a framed print. My guess is an image around 10 x 15" from a fine 35mm negative. Is that correct?

    What sort of exhibition? Club, private, public gallery ... whatever the photographer produces can be accommodated within reason (e.g. space). 20x24" (50x60cm) in large multi-mat frames from 35mm is surprisingly common in B&W.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  8. #18
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    If you can only print to 11x14" then mat it and frame it bigger. Sounds cheesy but the big mat and frame makes it seems like a bigger print than it is.
    Harry Pulley - Visit the BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE FORUM

    Happiness is...

  9. #19

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    At one of our fairly large public/city art museum, one can see photograph displayed in variety of methods, including pinned to a bare wall, scotch taped inside a window frame, to traditionally matted frames. There are also silver prints (FB) and inkjet types. If the artist wanted his/her work seen in certain way, so be it. I don't think there should be any standard at all. As an artist and a photographer, how you want your product to be seen is the right way.

    I would; however, make sure the image and the style I present is the best I can do: whatever the method I choose; and I make sure I show that I care about my product - because I do.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  10. #20

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    The Robin Bell (fine printer) exhibition showed prints tacked to the wall. I'd guess that if someone wants to buy he'll recommend his favourite framer and the client can negotiate with them. Photography seems to have moved towards fine art modes of presentation in the last 15 years.

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