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  1. #21
    clayne's Avatar
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    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  2. #22

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    Two good articles there Clayne. Early on in my photographic adventures I was asked by a city centre bank to put a show of work in their front window. As the deadline was close I opted to spray mount (photomount) the pictures onto board. I don't know what happened, close proximity to halogen light probably, but the photographs spent the week slowly peeling off and dropping to the shop window floor. The guy who dealt with exhibitions only came in once a week so there was no chance of remedial work. I wanted to crawl down the nearest sewer cover and die. A lesson learned.

  3. #23

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    Would you proudly hang an ink jet print in an Ikea frame on the wall in your home? If you answered no then you did not go to far.
    "Would you like it if someone that painted in oils told you that you were not making portraits because you were using a camera?"
    "Shouldn't it be more about the joy of producing and viewing the photo than what you paid for the camera?"

    Me

  4. #24

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    When I was in school they drilled proper presentation into us. Proper conservation mounting, museum board front and backing, etc. Everyone understood the standard and why it was the standard. After that people tended to deviate with presentation. This was generally intentional and often conceptually based to fit the work. I have no problem with this. I do however have a problem with thoughtless presentation out of ignorance or laziness. It's insulting to those who hang work around them and have put the time and money in and to the educated viewer.

  5. #25
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    I had my first exhibition in June and had to do everything on a shoestring budget.

    The venue was an old 18th century ballroom on the top floor of a club, so I wasn't allowed to hang anything on the walls! When I heard that, I though "ok fine, I'll just get some painter's easels and display the images on those". When I got home I thought about how many artists I knew and how many had more than one easel (it was a small total).

    Then I thought "Hell with it, I'll make the easels myself (13 of them)", so I did that and it worked out to be pretty economic, considering the materials were not hugely expensive and most of the cost was my own labour.

    I did a lot of shopping around, basically, looking for the cheapest frames I could find. I also considered making them but even though I had time on my side, I didn't have enough to make 26 frames of any good quality (woodwork is not my strongest skill).
    Most of the money I had saved went towards the purchase of frames from Ikea. I spent a lot of time deliberating over which ones, which colours, what size, value for money, etc.
    In the end, I got some nice 40x50cm and 50x50cm with a dark brown/almost black frame and cream board. This was the best I could do to frame 26 prints on my budget (probably the amount you'd pay to frame one or two photos approx the same size with museum quality materials!).

    I figure if someone wants a print of a different size or in a different frame, then that is always possible.

    So the standards I set for myself were high, but my budget was pretty low.
    I just did the best I could to present my work and I even sold a couple of prints! So I was really happy and had some great feedback, which was quite encouraging.

    The two articles above by Dave Kachel were really helpful, and next time I will be thinking more about materials and sizes of prints.

    Couple of pics from the day:
    http://twitpic.com/31civv/full
    http://twitpic.com/31cl3f/full
    http://twitpic.com/31cnc9/full

  6. #26

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    Very nice presentation. I think it compliments the images. Almost makes them appear more "important" than if they were hung. Well done.

  7. #27
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    I LOVE that presentation. I really like that it gets the art down off the wall and back into the human viewing range, and makes people get up close and personal with the work.

  8. #28

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    The frames work for me. I'd be slightly concerned about the easel legs being kicked by people who'd had one glass of wine too many.

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