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  1. #1
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    Slow Photo movement

    After reading Sea Photo's thread going back to "Real photography", I'm wondering if there's an the same movement with foodies called "Slow Food" movement started in Italy. The commonality is returning to old methods because the new methods of production doesn't yield the same quality. Am I way off base here?

  2. #2
    Dan Henderson's Avatar
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    I have not heard of the "slow food" movement, but your description sounds like the same debate raging here. I also compare it to the fact that many great guitar players still use 50 year old Fender, Gibson, Rickenbacker and other guitars, and run them through tube amps because newer digital equipment doesn't give them the same sound quality.


    web site: Dan Henderson, Photographer.com

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    I am not anti-digital. I am pro-film.

  3. #3
    keithwms's Avatar
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    Dan, the "slow food" movement was the beginning of what we now call the "local food" movement in most of the US; it originally took hold on the west coast but is now found throughout the country. It's meant to be the antithesis of the fast food / industrialized foods movement. If interested, pick up the book "Omnivore's Dilemma" by Michael Pollan...

    Anyway, Mainecoonmaniac, in my opinion, the photographic analogy to this movement would entail mixing of your own chems, making your own plates, coating your own papers, and being more conscientious about disposal. Investing in that entire process would indeed be much slower than the clickety click approach now found throughout digital photography. But I don't think merely working with the "old" film methods would go nearly as far, in spirit, as the slow/local foods movement goes. The spirit of that is really to take total responsibility rather than assuming that someone else will do it for you. And frankly I don't think there is any proud history of that in the film industry, which was scaled up for mass production since the invention of roll film. (Not that I think digital is any better in this regard, mind you)
    Last edited by keithwms; 11-14-2010 at 09:04 PM. Click to view previous post history.
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  4. #4

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    You may enjoy this feature from the NY Times last year, if you'd not seen it: "Essay: Slow Photography in an Instantaneous Age"

    http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/0...antaneous-age/

    Interesting, with wonderful pictures.

  5. #5
    Ian Leake's Avatar
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    Achieving the highest quality takes effort and commitment; and the highest quality is worth the time it takes to achieve it (sometimes). The Slow Food movement has recognised this, and I feel there is (or at least can be) a parallel in photography.

  6. #6

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    I've mentioned a possible overlap between the Slow Food Movement and film photography a few times here. I started to think about it more when I became interested in bread making and especially after I chucked out the bread maker and started experimenting with sourdough.
    Steve.

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    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Working with large formats is the equivalent of slow foods. The discipline and pace of working tends to spill over into subsequent work with smaller formats.

    Ian

  8. #8
    Dan Henderson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SWphoto View Post
    You may enjoy this feature from the NY Times last year, if you'd not seen it: "Essay: Slow Photography in an Instantaneous Age"

    http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/0...antaneous-age/

    Interesting, with wonderful pictures.
    A good essay on the virtues of LF photography, and great photographs as well. Thanks for sharing.


    web site: Dan Henderson, Photographer.com

    blog: https://danhendersonphotographer.wordpress.com/

    I am not anti-digital. I am pro-film.

  9. #9

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    one should be like an " iron chef " with a camera ..

    i don't believe quality and luscious image making has anything
    to do with speed ... seeing yes ...
    silver magnets, trickle tanks sold
    artwork often times sold for charity
    PM me for details

  10. #10

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    I see some similarity, but also some differences. The Slow Food movement seems to be largely about "food to the consumer", not so much a movement of people committed to using certain practices in their own kitchens for themselves.

    It's hard to draw the analogy very closely since food occupies such a special place in human society. So does art, of course, but the connection between the artistic process and the "quality" of what reaches the observer is much less clear than it is for food. (If I cook crap and feed it to you, you're eating crap. If I start with crap and make it into art, it might end up being pretty good art.)

    But the general current of what might be called "de-commodification" seems to be a commonality, maybe part of a broader change in social attitudes...

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

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