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  1. #11

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    When I was researching the bit in the paper I wrote that included post mortem shots I was suprised by the number of ones I came across of Mother and baby. A quick reminder of how dangerous the birthing process was/is.

    I was walking through a grave yard the other day (as you do,) and noticed the large number of graves (especialy Asian) that had photo's of the, resident? departed? on them. Found it interesting in relation to this thread.
    David Boyce

    When bankers get together for dinner, they discuss art. When artists get together for dinner, they discuss money. Oscar Wilde Blog fp4.blogspot.com

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by bmac
    I think most people would rather remember their loved ones how they looked when they were alive as opposed to how they looked once dead.
    I agree!

  3. #13

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    Having been to too many funerals this past year, this topic has come up with family and friends a number of times.

    While yes, there were much slower film long ago. That was not the reason for the death shots.

    We currently live in a fast paced world, where being in NY and LA in the same day is very common. Go back fifty years and travel was not as fast. Go back a hundred years and it was considered great if you made it cross country in less then a week.

    Add to this the fact that modern embalming techniques, while they date back to the Civil War, they were not in wide spread use. There was not as much time between when a person died and when they were buried. Family members could not travel far enough fast enough to make it to the funerals, or they could not afford to travel. So there was a need for post-mortem photography.

    I agree with Bmac, I'd rather remember my loved ones as they were in life.
    George Losse
    www.georgelosse.com

  4. #14
    Adrian Twiss's Avatar
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    I've seen such photos in books (especially children) and wondered why people photographed the dead, usually in their funerary finery. This thread explains it.

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