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  1. #1
    ted_smith's Avatar
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    Hollywood films still largely shot on film - I didn't know that

    I recently watched an episode of "How it's made" on one of the Sky channels and they showed the making of a Hollywod style video camera, used for making block buster films.

    I didn't know that modern films were still recorded on film...I'd assumed they'd gone digital and I'm really pleased to see that's not the case. Having thought about it some more since, and having heard in the show that the "camera exposes 120 frames for each second of the movie" I came to realise why that industry must be so critical to the likes of Fuji and Kodak. I assume it is the movie-making industry that accounts for the most use of traditional 35mm film? If 1 sec = 120 frames, that's nearly 4 rolls a second (I realise they use massive reels), or, for a 2 hour movie, 28,800 rolls!

    I went on Google to see what modern films have been noted for film use and the Lord of the Rings films are one, plus very recently, The Kings Speech (http://www.studiodaily.com/main/tech...cts/12926.html) and the next Johhny English film. No doubt there must be many others.
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  2. #2
    munz6869's Avatar
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    I think it's fairer to say "lots of Hollywood films are still shot on film", but more and more are digital, especially with the current 3D fad... The new "Hobbit" film is being shot digitally, for example...

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  3. #3

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    The frame rate is more like 20 frames per second, but it still amounts to a lot of film especially considering that much more film is shot than ends up on the screen.
    Unfortunately, I've heard that the silver prices are accelerating the move to digital for the movies.

  4. #4
    munz6869's Avatar
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    24 frames per second is the standard - although the Kinoton projector at my work has the option for 25 frames per second - great for the projectionist (gets to pack up/go home earlier), but terrible for folks with perfect pitch....

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  5. #5

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    Don't forget TV. In America, the "Law & Order" series (just one example), are shot on 35mm film, then scanned to digital in post.

  6. #6
    CGW
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    AMC's "Mad Men" shot on film, too.

  7. #7

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    It's not still April Fool's Day is it ?? Peter Jackson is one of Red Cameras main supporters - virtually a schill for them (and one of the main claims to fame of digital video cameras is their "overcranking" capabilities - up to 120 fps on the cheapest Red cameras and up to 600 fps on the Phantom - this is much harder or impossible to do with film). 24 fps is the standard film frame rate. Yes, Hollywood films are sometimes still produced on film, but they are rapidly becoming scarce. Whilst Lord of the Rings may have been shot on 35mm film before being digitally scanned, the new film - The Hobbit - is using approximately 30 Red digital cameras.

  8. #8
    CGW
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    AMC's "Mad Men" was shot on film, too. Christina Hendricks just wouldn't look the same...

  9. #9
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    The actual shooting of scenes is not a great consumer of film. The bulk of it is used in copies for distribution.


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  10. #10

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    Quite a few films are still shot on film, but with the rise of camera's like the RED ONE, it's becoming less frequent. Films like Pirates of the Caribbean 4, Harry potter 7 and The social network, to name a few.

    I hope that film doesn't die out. It still has advantages over digital, like you can rescan it at a higher resolution, you can't do that with digital, once you've filmed something you can't change the resolution without losing quality. Which menas the film industry will make more money in the long run with re-masted copies of the film.

    It will be inevitable that hollywood will stop using film, which is a shame. It's only really been in the last few years that digital has started it's takeover.

    The main thing I'm worried about, is if hollywood stops using film, then film will be discontinued altogether. When that happens, to everyone on apug, everyone who shoots film, we will have a huge global protest.

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