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  1. #21
    Diapositivo's Avatar
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    Maybe some people is obsessed with the way they look and don't want to be portrayed with a dirty or misplaced hair. Somebody, you know, might see the picture and suspect they aren't perfect.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  2. #22

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    I was shooting with a long lens on the street in NYC once. They allow(ed?) anyone there to sell books on the street without a license so, there were a lot of, shall we say, different folks, selling books off tables. I was leaning against a building, shooting way down the street, and one of the 'vendors' came screaming at me waving a book to stop taking his picture because I was CIA and he didn't want the CIA bothering him any more. The camera wasn't even pointed in his direction. After 30 seconds or so of screaming, he then went back to his table and got underneath it.

    Being the sensitive, understanding soul that I am, I moved on before he came back ...

  3. #23

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    I do a lot of social/event photography... the people at these events usually welcome the attention.
    I have even been asked to photograph a funeral... that was kinda weird, but I did it, I had to explain that I was "official" to a few people who thought I was a nut.
    Right after the Princess Diana accident.. I was given harsh treatment for the few months afterward by younger women who though "paparatzi" killed Diana.

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    I very rarely do street photography, but if someone tells me not to take their photograph, I do not.

    Steve
    I was threatened by a prisoner being hauled out of court... he lunged at me and said; I was next. He is still in prison I think.
    A DUI defendants family told me I would burn in hell for what I was doing (photographing their daughter on the stand) that had killed people in a DUI.
    I also photographed in a woman's prison for a day... I was humbled by that, and actually felt bad photographing some of the inmates. These inmates had no choice in me photographing them at work.

  5. #25
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    i don't do it often ...
    i always remember a night that person i photographed w/o permission
    grabbed my camera, wouldn't give it back and threatened to beat me with it
    ... i try to keep that in mind when photographing people ... (that happened 25 years ago )

  6. #26

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    A few years ago a 30-something beautiful person on the beach in LaJolla got all upset at me for taking a picture of her dog as it was joyfully running running around. How self-absorbed is that?

  7. #27

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    When I was asked to photograph a Renewal of Vows ceremony at a nudist resort in 2007, there was almost assault and afray at one of the guests' tables I was asked to photograph when a portly man with snowy white hair reeled back as quickly as he could (pushing and shoving others around him out of the way). Two other guests also made themselves scant through polite shyness. It's part of my training that I don't question what people are doing or why — just wait for them to settle down or move off, then get on with the shoot. Later, after talking to the resort operator, I then found out the guy making the fuss was a Senior Sergeant at a country police station and was afraid of the repercussions of his photograph being seen by colleagues, or something worse being happened. I did go over it myself in my head afterwards: 'surely what people do in their private time has nothing to do with their professional time?'. The vast majority of naturists engaged in that past-time are not averse to being photographed or being published in magazines, but some that do not know you, or feel uncomfortable, can have an extreme reaction to the presence of a camera/photographer.

  8. #28
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    Truth be told asking permission and not asking permission gives very different results. So, I guess I should say sometimes I ask permission.. sometimes I don't. It really depends on what kind of picture I want to take.
    When I'm walking around and I see an interesting character for a picture and I want to take a PORTRAIT of said subject, I'll almost ALWAYS ask permission. When a situation is unfolding in front of the camera (such as Wolfeye's scenario) I will almost NEVER ask for permission. Though frequently, I'll take the picture then ask permission for a second one.

    My theory is as follows.. Most people don't mind (or don't notice) being photographed (I guess that's still a fair statement, though I do think things tend to change for the worst here). If I become aware that they are offended or uneasy in anyway I'll apologize, and if they're friendly, I'll explain and start some kind of conversation. If they become aggressive, verbal, and/or unpleasant, I'll just walk away. Honestly, it's just a dam picture, and it's not worth me hearing your opinions about my family members.

    I had a situation once, where a friend was taking a picture of a street and on this street there was a stand and the stand owner saw it fit to lecture us (for an extended period of time) on the etiquette of picture taking. Claiming that we should have ask him permission first.. That when he was a photographer that was the first lesson they taught him.. bla, bla, bla.....
    I'm sorry, these situations aren't analogues to "The costumer is always right". You don't know my art, you don't know what I'm doing. If you're interested, I'll explain it in detail. If you're not, I AM SINCERELY SORRY, now quit wasting my time, this light ain't gonna last forever!

    I guess the best rule of thumb in these situations - Aim for physical integrity! Good Luck!

  9. #29
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    "To photograph people is to violate them, by seeing them as they never see themselves, by having knowledge of them that they can never have; it turns people into objects that can be symbolically possessed. Just as a camera is a sublimation of the gun, to photograph someone is a subliminal murder - a soft murder, appropriate to a sad, frightened time." - Susan Sontag, On Photography

    It's the illusion of losing control - a threat in a sense: he was in a place of comfort and that safety was suddenly breached by the arrival of your camera. You're threatening to take a piece of him that he will no longer control once the shutter clicks.

    I've probably reacted nearly in the same way as your colleague in the past when a camera has been introduced to my personal space. I'm nearly phobic of being in front of a loaded lens.


    I have no stories of people reacting wildly (I usually photograph places devoid of people), but I guess I am that story for someone else. Hahah.

  10. #30

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    I hardly ever have my photo taken. I don't like it so I avoid it. And in my job it happens often, Very hard to explain to others why I do not want to allow it. So I tell them my mothers religion forbids it and So I must respect her wishes and avoid being photographed.They look at me strange and then walk away, Any other reason doesn't seem to work. On my side if there is an expectation of privacy I do not take the shot before asking.In a public space at a public event with no expectation I just take the shot

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