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  1. #21
    bjorke's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by david b
    I think being naked takes the stress off of being in front of the camera.
    I used to think that too but it's tedious, the photographer really needs to have pockets or the whole process bogs down.

    Generally I don't care, though I find it next to impossible to "just be natural" whatever the heck that means (esp. for me) (or was it "au naturel"?).

    Playing with a video camera can help solve camera anxiety. Also, as a sitter/subject, just see past the camera to the person holding it, or alternatively think of the camera itself as a person, set it in your imagination as a specific sort of observer, rather than (as many people do who have stage/camera fright) an amorphous social "everyone." If you imagine the camera as specifically friendly/hostile/disinterested/sexy/whatever, your attitude and relationship to that (imaginary) person will come through in the photo.

    "What Would Zeus Do?"
    KBPhotoRantPhotoPermitAPUG flickr Robot

  2. #22
    Cheryl Jacobs's Avatar
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    Personally, I hate it. I just feel like an idiot.

  3. #23

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    Doesn't matter to me... But I find that I over analyze it... Where's the sun/main light, how should I stand, where are my hands etc.

    I can't help but think AS the photographer, just on the other side.

    Perhaps we prefer the other side of the camera because we like to be in control of the image making process... To be a model means a surrender of those controls we enjoy. Just an idea...

    joe

  4. #24
    blansky's Avatar
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    I don't really care. I never much like the results and don't think I look too good but I do the good sport thing and comply.

    It's hard to preach the whole posterity thing and then start whining when the camera points at you.




    Michael McBlane
    I couldn't think of anything witty to say so I left this blank.

  5. #25
    Max Power's Avatar
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    Funny, being photographed by a still camera doesn't bother me too terribly much, especially if I feel I have some control over the process.
    What I abhor and flee actively is the dim-wit with the video camera...Point that evil machine somewhere else.
    To discourage uncle bob with the video camera, I will actually walk away, and if I can't, I'll put up my hands and not make a sound.
    Horrid things, can't abide them
    Max Power, he's the man who's name you'd love to touch! But you mustn't touch! His name sounds good in your ear, but when you say it, you mustn't fear! 'Cause his name can be said by anyone!

  6. #26
    Helen B's Avatar
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    General agreement with Michael's sentiment.

    I can't imagine why, but I get photographed quite often. I don't mind it. Is it those two good sisters again: Do-as-you-would-be-done-by and Be-done-by-as-you-did?

    Except that I'm not a furtive photographer, so it's not always true that I get what I deserve. The furtive ones are amusing. Furtive, they are. Aye, furtive. Not daring to raise their camera to their eye. Sneaking around thinking that you haven't noticed them while you're pretending not to have noticed. Oh, we know their sort, don't we?

    I used to live in the famous Hotel Chelsea where the lobby is a bit of a magnet for sneaky-arty-tourist-type photographers. I moved to Hell's Kitchen where we get strays from Times Square. Different class of tourist altogether. And now we can add in ubiquitous Beavises and Buttheads with camera phones.

    My experience with photographer-strangers who ask to take my picture is that they seem to rush too much. If I was in a hurry I'd say no and go about my business. If I say yes, I say yes to doing the job properly. So they get friendly advice to slow down a bit, gentle suggestions about the best light and some general chit-chat to put them at ease - how many photographers are nervous about approaching strangers? No 'and they don't come any stranger than you' jokes please.

    Best,
    Helen

  7. #27

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    I refuse point blank to pose for a picture and will only sit still for an id picture, ie passport. Other than that I don't really mind as long as the "photographer" isn't lurking and sneaking shots.

    I hate security camera's though as they only ever seem to focus on my bald patch

  8. #28
    jim kirk jr.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cheryl Jacobs
    Personally, I hate it. I just feel like an idiot.
    They say doctors make the worst patients...maybe it applies to photography as well...
    The only one I want near me is the one in my hand...
    "An object never performs the same function as its name or its image"-Rene Magritte

    "An image of a dog does not bite"-William James applied to photography

  9. #29
    bobfowler's Avatar
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    I became a photographer for the same reason that I learned to play saxophone. Playing the sax keeps me off the dance floor and shooting pictures keeps me on the base side of the film (of glass side of the plate).

    I don't have bad hair days, I have a bad hair life...
    Bob Fowler
    fowler@verizon.net
    Some people are like Slinkies. They're really good for nothing, but they still bring a smile to your face when you push them down a flight of stairs.

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Helen B
    My experience with photographer-strangers who ask to take my picture is that they seem to rush too much. If I was in a hurry I'd say no and go about my business. If I say yes, I say yes to doing the job properly. So they get friendly advice to slow down a bit, gentle suggestions about the best light and some general chit-chat to put them at ease - how many photographers are nervous about approaching strangers? No 'and they don't come any stranger than you' jokes please.

    Best,
    Helen
    Yes - I don't find it easy to approach a stranger seeking a photograph. But then again, it very much depends on their expectations for privacy. If the person is a regular member of the public quietly going about their own business, normally they'd be rather surprised and suspicious of someone pointing a camera at them. So why are you? Is it because of the way they look - unusually ugly, beautiful or is it because of something they are doing - skipping over a puddle, falling off the kirb, throwing their kids up in the air? Whatever the reason is, it's likely to be at least a small invasion of their privacy.
    If OTOH the person is frequently 'in the public eye' for whatever reason, and they know and have come to exept that as part of their lifestyle .... well I guess as a photographer you're then dealing with a different expectation, and it might be easier.
    But I still would not feel any more comfortable asking for a photograph (or pinching one).
    BTW I still love candid people photography. It's exhillarating for the photographer, and still one of the most under-rated artforms imo.
    best, John
    Last edited by John McCallum; 10-06-2004 at 04:47 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: granmar

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