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  1. #31
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by benjiboy View Post
    I think it has little anything to do with exposure Steve, but more about what makes a successful monochrome picture isn't the same as a colour picture, and I for one find it very hard to "think" in both at the same time, it's like trying to translate in two languages at once.
    One of the things I started playing with when I got my RB was simply taking one shot B&W and switching backs to shoot exactly the same shot at exactly the same placement with an incident meter at box speed.

    What I found is that my best shots normally work well in either black or color. In fact for me it's been hard to find a nice B&W composition that won't work well in color.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by brian steinberger View Post
    Explain?
    I think that was supposed to be sarcasm.
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

    -----

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  3. #33

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    If you look at the work of a photographer like William Eggleston it's almost exclusively 'about' colour. It simply wouldn't have the same impact in B&W, although Eggleston did shoot monochrome in his earlier years. By contrast Ansel Adams' landscapes rely on texture and tone for impact. Some subjects are less clear, a good street photograph can be enhanced by the colours in it, or lessened. Martin Parr's shots work in colour, Tony Ray-Jones covered similar subjects successfully in black and white.

    Digital photographers don't have the same problem, they simply desaturate a colour photograph. My response is to shoot black and white but carry a colour body for images that clearly need it. That works out about one roll of C41 or E6 for every four B&W. Others may have an opposite ratio, whatever, I feel a little naked if I don't have colour stock somewhere on me, even if it's in a compact camera.

  4. #34
    MDR
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    Use C41 color film

    and choose the color or lack thereof at the printing stage, Print the color negative on R4 paper for color and on classic B/W paper for B/W. Or use a camera with exchangeable backs Rollei 3003, Zeiss Contarex , the last model Contaflex for 35mm and Hassy, Bronica, Mamiya for Medium format.

  5. #35
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Because color can make a composition work that would not work for black & white, I find that switching back and forth between the two when working on a subject forces me to make better compositions in color and push myself to make better compositions in black & white.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

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