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  1. #1

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    The Lesson of Engelbert Humperdinck

    Often we see posts on APUG asking how a photographer achieved a particular look. Now curiousity is perfectly valid and can lead to many positive things. But it's not a good idea to closely imitate someone else's style. The german composer Engelbert Humperdinck was so enamoured of the music of Richard Wagner that he sought to imitate it in every possible way. Deservedly or not he shall always be known as a Wagner wannabe. I think there is a lesson here.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  2. #2
    Newt_on_Swings's Avatar
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    For humans, life is about imitation, such is the way that we learn. Even our thought patterns when describing a particular form of art or image is to offer references to other similar pieces. Very few get to break out of the mold, of those who do, many are misunderstood or undiscovered, they are scattered by the wayside, the few who are successful, are remembered for all history. That being said, the human mind is an endless well of creativity, it would be a waste to spend a life copying another. Im thankful of the age that we live in, there are so many creative minds out there, and only now do we have such access to see and hear them so easily.

  3. #3
    Jim Jones's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    . . . The german composer Engelbert Humperdinck was so enamoured of the music of Richard Wagner that he sought to imitate it in every possible way. Deservedly or not he shall always be known as a Wagner wannabe. I think there is a lesson here.
    Humperdinck is best known for the charming opera, Hansel and Gretel. Wagner couldn't have tackled that story without encumbering it with interminable hours of Teutonic yowling and theatrical excesses. Gustav Mahler was another fan of Wagner. Despite that, he also wrote some fine music. I much admire the photography of Adams and Weston. Unfortunately, my photos don't indicate this.

  4. #4

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    Don't emulate a single photographer's style. Emulate several and keep adding styles and techniques to your repertoire and before long you'll have your own style without knowing it.

  5. #5

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    Engelbert's version of 'Please Release Me' was a bit of a crowd pleaser, though ;-)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rCZO9xeYA8g
    Steve

  6. #6

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    everyone ends up being a wannabe in one way or another
    ask me how ..

  7. #7
    Jim Jones's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by steven_e007 View Post
    Engelbert's version of 'Please Release Me' was a bit of a crowd pleaser, though ;-)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rCZO9xeYA8g
    The famous German composer Englebert Humperdinck lived from 1854 to 1921. I understand a contemporary musician has recently been performing under his name

  8. #8
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Jones View Post
    Humperdinck is best known for the charming opera, Hansel and Gretel. Wagner couldn't have tackled that story without encumbering it with interminable hours of Teutonic yowling and theatrical excesses.
    That is so funny because it is so true!

    Even if you imitate another's work it is probably impossible to completely duplicate it because you instinctively introduce little bits of your own style. Even if Humperdinck wrote operas LIKE Wagner he could not have wrote operas that duplicated them. Only operas that EMULATE them.

    Further, by emulating another's work you also learn something about the person.

    There is a reason I posted my father's photos on my Flickr site:
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randyst...7627061002122/

    He died when I was 17 years old and I inherited his negatives. For years, I kept them safe but didn't do anything with them but, a while ago, I got them out and scanned them. As I looked at those images, I learned many subtle things about the way my father thought and saw the world when he was alive. I got the opportunity to know my father by looking at his work and studying it and emulating it.

    Humperdinck got to know Wagner in a similar way by studying is work and emulating it.

    A person who emulates another's photography also has a chance to learn from it in a similar way.

    It is immoral to simply copy another's work but it is not immoral if you learn from it and grow from it.

    We are great because we stand on the shoulders of giants.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standin...ders_of_giants
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

    -----

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  9. #9

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    Or this becomes your legacy: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Hpduyuf1eM



 

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