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  1. #1
    IloveTLRs's Avatar
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    Psychological hang-ups regarding cameras - anyone else?

    I like to think of myself as an equal opportunity employer when it comes to cameras. That is, I like to think I can use anything without prejudice. However, in practice I've found I have certain psychological hang-ups that prevent me from picking up certain cameras

    The best example is the Rollei 35, I think. Great camera (no matter the lens) but I usually get those nagging thoughts before leaving the house: "what if I want to do close-focus/wide-open?", "what happens when the sun goes down?", etc, etc so nine times out of ten I end up taking something else. Which is unfortunate, because I sit here looking at the results, mentally kicking myself for not taking it out more often.

    Does anyone else have this problem or is it only me? Or have I just had too much wine with dinner again ...
    Those who know, shoot film

  2. #2

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    And I usually end up with a whole Nikon F kit in the trunk for just that reason.

    I finally got a small lunch box sized cooler, put a hand towel in the bottom, a zip lock with film and a meter and my Rolliecord, and just leave them in the car. Doesn't look like anything valuable, and it's there. When I take it out, I'm always fussing about no filters, need a longer lens and so on,,, but, at least I've got a camera.

  3. #3
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
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    I have a small stable of 4 over the shoulder bags, two backbpacks and two rolling case camera bags, that transport anything from my 35mm to MF to 4x5 cameras.

    They usually have a given camera in them, with, for 35mm and MF, a few loners that mostly sit on the shelf that can be alternated into a bag.

    So the tan over the shoulder os my good for anything that a 35mm slr situation. The blue one is a walk in the country kind of bag. the old leather one is the close up setup.

    Artificial lighting is the subject of whole separate cases, altough most of my bags have a smallnon-dedicated hot shoe/pc cord flash, and the MF backpad has a light potatoe masher type as standard equiment.

    I do consider the lighting conditions when it comes to packing film and filters, and whether I bring a table top little tripod,or one of the heavier units.
    my real name, imagine that.

  4. #4
    dasBlute's Avatar
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    often, the inner dialog is a hinderance to creative work. It is easy to wear yourself out: I should be... I could be... it can be hard to clear the clutter out between you and the work.

    I have two cameras: a big one and a little one, I pick one and walk. There is no wrong one. Depending on your mindset, constraints can be challenging, motivating, freeing. Sure I miss shots - all the time - but invariably it's *not* because of the camera.

  5. #5
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    I used to have this type of angst.

    For 2011 and 2012 through July I am committed to the use of one single camera, a 35mm. I put either a 35mm or a 50mm lens on it, and take it to go. The tripod is in the trunk of my car, and I carry cable release and light meter with me at all times.

    It forces me to stop thinking about the camera, and only the pictures. And it's a profound revelation.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  6. #6

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    Yea Team!!! somebody actually doing the one year thing What's your film?

  7. #7
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grif View Post
    Yea Team!!! somebody actually doing the one year thing What's your film?
    Acros (have a boat load of it, which needs to get used up) and TMY-2. (both in Xtol).
    Portra 400 for color, home processed in Rollei Digibase with a modified work flow.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  8. #8
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    The only time I have that sort of angst is on overnight trips where I don't know ahead of time exactly what I'll want. I usually end up taking all of mine - one bag of 35mm gear, one with the Yashica TLR, and the big one with the 4x5 Linhof, plus the tripod, and sometimes (the most likely to be left behind since I also have my iPhone) the small case with the old Nikon digisnapper. It generally amuses my fiance, who already finds it funny that she packs far lighter in the way of clothes and so on than I do. Well she's traveled a lot more and has a better idea of what she'll need. That's my excuse anyway, and I'm sticking to it.

    For each outing from base, whether from home or a vacation spot where I'm staying, I can usually pick one bag and go. For walking around doing other things but might need the camera, it's usually the Yashica, unless I expect really dim light in which case it's the 35mm with the 1.7 lens and TMZ. (I always have some Delta 3200 with the Yashica too but the 3.5 lens isn't a 1.7, nor is the Yashica, even with its built in fresnel, as easy to focus in dim light as my Pentax LX. Some day I'll pony up the bucks for a 1.4 or 1.2.) One camera, fixed lens, square format so there's not even a need to choose vertical or horizontal, though I often see which way I'll crop it. It is rather liberating, but I don't think I could ever do the "shoot only one camera all year" thing and certainly not if confined to one film.

  9. #9

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    I always thought it'd be a really good learning experience. I guess the closest I got was a C33 with an 80mm and tri x in Microdol, and (I think?) Kodacolor X. I guess, if I really took a lot of pic's with it, the Rollie and 400 film would be a good experience. I'm getting about a roll every 6 weeks out of it now.

  10. #10

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    I'm pretty much of that breed too, take one body and one lens and let the rest happen. Should I have additional lenses one generally stays on the camera, while the other bounces in the backpack. Travel light I have learned, it's better for my back too
    Regards
    Charles

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