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  1. #11
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    You need to know why you're editing. Usually it's for a project, and first you need to set out your parameters, it's harder if it's random images.

    I agree with John, in the past I've learnt a lot through workshops etc, and also lecturing and talking about my own work. I am quite ruthless in my editing but I'll often leave in images I've no intention of using to see how others react.

    Ian

  2. #12
    VaryaV's Avatar
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    ps. I never throw my work away. The real crappy ones, yes, but the in-between ones I put in boxes and mark 'good, not chosen.' As others stated you can go back to them later and oftentimes re-discover an image you may not have liked initially but you change and your tastes change over time.

    You guys have a lot of great tips going here.
    Sourdough, salami and blue cheese... and 2 dogs drooling with such sad, sad eyes. ... they're working me... they know I'll cave!

    APUG Portfolio

  3. #13

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    I edit "in the field" before making the pictures. Most of my exposures are made only after stalking the location, sometimes for months, going back over and over again to try different vantage points, angles, framing etc etc. By the time I make the exposure the entire thing has been refined to my satisfaction, or else I don't bother. And I'm probably the most brutal crtitic possible, not only at the exposure stage but then in printing. So by the time I have a finished print of an image, I'm uninterested in most peoples' opinions and comments. What do they know anyway? It is exactly the way I wanted it or it would not have existed. There are exceptions here and there where after some time has passed I might think about a slightly different printing approach, but not the composition.

    Having said all that, it is not the way most people would (or should) work. For one thing, output is very slow. But that is simply something I have to live with. It's in my personality. I'm obsessive and exacting, probably too exacting, and the process can become quite slow. However maybe in the end it kind of balances out - I make less pictures, but don't have to disgard so many either. It's also worth noting my approach only works with subject matter that is relatively static and close by - although even seemingly static subjects sometimes change unexpectedly and I've lost some images this way, by waiting too long.

  4. #14

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    I am really new to this.To take pictures on film, to make a pinhole, to use and old Smena 8, to buy an old Zenit E that died a couple of days ago.I have no other camera, just my phone.What I love about film is that you cannot delete that picture.Until you get it out, you really have no clues if it went out ok or not.Sometimes the most shity pictures give you an idea to use in the future.By mistake you get a totally new angle regarding photography and it's own philosophy.I really love what I am doing, I wish to get better and better.the fact is I want one advice from time to time, but nothing more.I want to discover myself what photography is to me.Like learning to walk again.You see others walking, their own way of doing it, but you will have to learn yours by yourself.That is why I love photography, that is why I am going or trying to go back to the roots.Simple photography, complex methods, whatever I can, step by step.The only thing that I hate about photography is the money.Without them, it's hard to do it and discover it.These are just some thoughts of mine and I hope that my grammar did not scare you, I know it's rusty.Best wishes, best photographs.

    Alex Cruceru.

  5. #15

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    Alex, your grammer is just fine. You have said it very well.

  6. #16
    wfe
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    I look at contact sheets searching for images that speak loudly to me. If they don't speak loudly and I don't feel they have strength then I don't print them. There are times when I'll have nothing I like on a few rolls of film (MF 12 exposures) and other times when I'll have threee that I like. I will also revisit the contact sheets at different times. I believe it's important to look them over at different times as our frame of mind changes. This is also speaking from the perspective of making personal work as opposed to a specific assignment or project that would have very specific defined goals and objectives. If working on a project or assignment then my shooting and editing would be focused on the goals and objectives of the project.
    ~Bill
    "Real Art is a Thin Breath Exhaled Amidst a Struggle in the Mind"
    Fine Art and Portraits

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