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  1. #51
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Thinking about this, I have some further things to say.

    Denise quite validly supports the art emulsion. She has even used this term often. I agree and I support them as well.

    I also support the advance emulsions. Many do not.

    In addition to the advanced emulsions, I wish to support the link between the old "art" emulsions and the more modern forms, and I wish to connect the two and explain the reasons (to my limited ability) so that future workers can connect the dots because without the reasoning many gaps will remain and much will be lost.

    I hope this clarifies some things.

    PE

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
    In terms of futuristic cameras, I am surprised that marketing men have not yet produced a camera, with instead of a shutter speed dial, it has settings like HCB, Kertesz, Sudek, Atget.
    It wouldn't be popular. That Sudek setting would cost an arm! And the Van Gogh setting would cost you an ear!

    Given a rendering engine in the camera, then things like that could be possible, and a style could be replicated. After all, 100 years is a long time for people to teach stupid tricks to smart pieces of rock. We already have P&S cameras with "smile finders" on them.

  3. #53
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    My grand vision of photography in 100 years time will by like nothing before, film will be a primitive technology, digital imaging as we know it will be a folly of the past. And the new photographic technologies will do such things as record light in Bose Einstein condensates.The light will be focused into the BEC slowed and then stopped and the light can be ever so slowly released from the condensate. The Result will not be an interpretation of the light from the moment the photograph was taken, but rather the image will actually be the light from the moment you took the photograph. Of course this too will be succeeded by a far more advanced quantum process that will reveal to us photographic moments in time. The mother of future photography will be Dr Lene Vestergaard Hau. Check out this link to see a snippet into her ground breaking work.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EK6HxdUQm5s
    "Its my profession to hijack time" ~ Stephen Frizza.

  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stephen Frizza View Post
    My grand vision of photography in 100 years time will by like nothing before, film will be a primitive technology, digital imaging as we know it will be a folly of the past. And the new photographic technologies will do such things as record light in Bose Einstein condensates.The light will be focused into the BEC slowed and then stopped and the light can be ever so slowly released from the condensate. The Result will not be an interpretation of the light from the moment the photograph was taken, but rather the image will actually be the light from the moment you took the photograph. Of course this too will be succeeded by a far more advanced quantum process that will reveal to us photographic moments in time. The mother of future photography will be Dr Lene Vestergaard Hau. Check out this link to see a snippet into her ground breaking work.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EK6HxdUQm5s
    If this is for real and not like the glass camera, it has fantastic potential.

  5. #55

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    It seems to me, looking at the most notable contemporary work, that photography is fast becoming a purely documentary medium. Our contemporary art photographers will define not only where photography heads as an art form, but force changes in technology. Technology always has to meet the boundaries pushed by the artists and innovators of course. In terms of capturing the moment in every angle in an instant, sadly, this is where camera technology is heading because this is what the professionals, artists and consumers alike now demand. In our lightning fast, no nonsense world concerned with efficiency, we don't have time for composition or the art, the most important thing is 'the moment' that we will have forgotten by next Tuesday - when the world will be a different place again. The camera is inevitably becoming our 'third eye'. I'm convinced we're 'coming to our senses' about what the true value of the photograph is to us, in today's world - memories we didn't have time to experience.

    Camera technology now facilitates our evolutionary needs. The loss, of course, will be the art.

  6. #56
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    I may have imagined it, but I recall seeing a recent advert on TV for a camera that captures moments before you press the shutter, in case you miss it. Is this really a camera that takes pictures when you don’t want it to? The mind boggles.

  7. #57

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    Back to the topic of having a 3-D representation of the original scene... My kids each got Nintendo 3DS for Christmas. They have 3 cameras built into it. They're d*g*tal, but I digress, as that's not what amazed me about this portable game system. One of the screens is quite capable of displaying 3D images. The viewing angle is narrow but there's no need for 3D glasses to see the 3D effect. It will even do 3D video. So being able to record a scene in 3D and display it for a viewer without the hassles of wearing 3D glasses is in the here and now on a system that can fit in the palm of your hand.

    Of course, nothing beats a projected slide, but this is still pretty amazing.

    ME Super

  8. #58
    cliveh's Avatar
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    How can you view 3D without glasses?

  9. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
    I may have imagined it, but I recall seeing a recent advert on TV for a camera that captures moments before you press the shutter, in case you miss it. Is this really a camera that takes pictures when you don’t want it to? The mind boggles.
    One of the video cameras I use in my TV work that can do just that. It stores a user specified amount of footage in a buffer and appends that footage to the beginning when you press the record button. Since I do production work, it's never used, but a news guy for instance might find it very nice.

  10. #60
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    Guys, Kodak had a 3D print system using the same method about 30 years ago. They published their annual report back then with a 3D cover. And today, in Beijing, the airport displays are 3D. All with no glasses.

    Kodak also made an experimental version of color paper in 3D. I've seen some pretty nice photos using it.

    The method uses an angled prism display or front surface which allows each eye to see a different view, but as noted, the viewing angle is very narrow or you get artifacts.

    PE



 

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