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  1. #1
    EASmithV's Avatar
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    Do 6x12 negatives on 120 constitute enough surface area to be considered LF?

    Do 6x12 negatives on 120 constitute enough surface area to be considered LF? How about 6x17?

    6x12 has more surface area than 3x4 inches.
    www.EASmithV.com

    "The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera."— Dorothea Lange
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    RIP Kodachrome

  2. #2
    Jerevan's Avatar
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    I think it depends on who you ask, really. If LF means sheet film only, no. But then there are cameras that take sheet film sizes from 4x6.5 cm, which is considered a medium format size... It's one of those zen koans - it's something that bends your mind out of shape.
    “Do your work, then step back. The only path to serenity.” - Lao Tzu

  3. #3
    Danielle's Avatar
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    I say no (personally of course). I agree that large format is sheet film, the way I always saw it.

    Panoramic formats are just that. They still use 120 film though.

  4. #4
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    I agree that it's how you look at it. Many people consider the Hasslblad XPan to be medium format; some say because one dimension is long enough to qualify as medium format; some say it is because the lens has to have a medium format sized image circle.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  5. #5
    L Gebhardt's Avatar
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    I don't care about the film size. When I think of large format, I think of view cameras. I have owned a 5x7 point and shoot (Hobo) and it was very far from my view cameras (kept the lens and sold the body for what I paid for the both, which was the reason for buying it). When I shoot 6x17 or 6x12 on my 4x5 I think of it as large format because the camera setup is the same with the possibility of full movements. I imagine if I had a 6x17 that used a focus helical it wouldn't feel like large format.

    To me it's the camera that makes LF. To others it's the film area, and to others it's the use of sheet film. I say don't worry about it and buy the camera you want, irregardless of how other people label it.

  6. #6
    Dan Henderson's Avatar
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    When I expose 4x5" film with my Linhof I say "large format." When I shoot 120 roll film through my Hasselblad, I say "medium format." Fortunately the distinction is easy for me to make.

    I suspect that my friend John Powers and his 7x17 camera scoff inwardly at my definition of LF!


    web site: Dan Henderson, Photographer.com

    blog: https://danhendersonphotographer.wordpress.com/

    I am not anti-digital. I am pro-film.

  7. #7
    michaelbsc's Avatar
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    In my mind the LF, MF, and miniature format designations are more about the camera body design and handling than about the film substrate.

    I think of film classified by size. 120 is 120. Sheet film is sheet film. I don't think the distinctions make as much sense for the film. I have often wondered why people spend hundreds of dollars for a 6 x 12 roll film adapter when there is a perfectly usable 6 x 12 image in a 4 x 5 film holder. but my place is not to judge others.
    Michael Batchelor
    Industrial Informatics, Inc.
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    The camera catches light. The photographer catches life.

  8. #8

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    6x12 is a medium-format format, as is 6x17 and 6x24. Format is not defined simply by area.

  9. #9
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    When 120n roll film was first used, probably on 6x9 format, it was considered to be miniature.


    Steve.

  10. #10
    michaelbsc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    When 120n roll film was first used, probably on 6x9 format, it was considered to be miniature.


    Steve.
    Maybe. I don't know for sure. But I thought the language usage was more like

    A) In the early days the various sheet film sizes were called by their size.

    B) Roll film arrived and was designated by various numbers, like the surviving 120 and barely surviving 127 and dead 116. The 127 size got the moniker "vest pocket" size.

    C) Barnack uses cine film and it becomes known as miniature format.

    Of course, I might have that totally screwed up. Counting on me to be the historian is a fools game.
    Michael Batchelor
    Industrial Informatics, Inc.
    www.industrialinformatics.com

    The camera catches light. The photographer catches life.

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