Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,211   Posts: 1,532,000   Online: 1186
      
Page 4 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 54
  1. #31
    tomalophicon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Canberra, ACT.
    Shooter
    Sub 35mm
    Posts
    1,562
    Images
    24
    Get a 20x24 and be done with it.

  2. #32

    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
    Shooter
    Med. Format RF
    Posts
    44
    Images
    2

    Thanks to all for your interest and generosity in responding. Notes in the body ext.

    I read though everyones thoughts, and I think I see a general theme:

    large format is king! (and I'm very tempted, but the cost of darkroom/camera set-up is just too much for me at present)

    my assumptions about the format are more-or less correct, though 'improvement' over 35mm may not be as great as I expect.

    My assumption about equipment requirements are not correct. There are a lot of recommendations for very low cost TLR's.

    Most importantly I had one very insightful PM (I'm not sure if I should quote a PM, apologies if I get the etiquette wrong) effectively advising me to put more effort into improving my work with 35mm first. after thinking hard about my results and how I get them, I believe he's correct.

    So, here's my plan:

    stay with my 35mm for while & use my tripod more, much more,
    take more shots with bracketing or simpy sacrifice a few shots on each roll to keep my 'projects' fresh in my mind for darkroom work.
    buy a lightmeter to enable incident and improve/ease spot metering,
    test my safelight and replace if necessary (I can hear a collective 'well; doh!'),
    buy a better enlarger lens (unless someone can specificaly say that my 6-element 50mm Komura or 75mm Fujinon's are in fact, good enough? when I do well, my 8x10's seem deadly sharp to my inexperienced eye with the 50, though I admit to not having tried the 75 seriuosly yet)
    use more Acros and less Tri-x, and try out that bottle of rodinal that came in one of my box-lots. If I like it better than D-76, buy some more! But generaly, move my 'standard' film/developer combo to smaller grain/higher accutance. And put more effort into keeping my chems fresh! (I can hear another collective 'well; doh!')
    print more, lots more (hey, I like it! and as I'm thinking about what I'm doing I'm bound to improve, and using my chems quickly has to be better than dumping them due to age, right?)
    Keep an eye out for bargain TLR, 'cause it's gonna happen sooner or later! Anything with a tessar taking lens and clean mirror methinks...)

    Thanks again for all your support,

    MattPC.

  3. #33
    jp498's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Owls Head ME
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,467
    Images
    74
    AFAIK, fuji doesn't make bad lenses; if you have a fujinon enlarging lens, it's probably good. There are many people with no-name enlarging lenses that have seen better days.

    Tessar TLRs are a good bargain. I think the triplet Yashica lenses are almost as good and better than most people would expect.

  4. #34
    Two23's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    South Dakota
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    299
    Quote Originally Posted by MattPC View Post
    stay with my 35mm for while & use my tripod more, much more,
    take more shots with bracketing or simpy sacrifice a few shots on each roll to keep my 'projects' fresh in my mind for darkroom work.
    buy a lightmeter to enable incident and improve/ease spot metering,
    test my safelight and replace if necessary (I can hear a collective 'well; doh!'),
    buy a better enlarger lens (unless someone can specificaly say that my 6-element 50mm Komura or 75mm Fujinon's are in fact, good enough? when I do well, my 8x10's seem deadly sharp to my inexperienced eye with the 50, .



    Well..........if you shot an 8x10 LF camera, you wouldn't need an enlarger at all. Just contact print them.




    Kent in SD

  5. #35
    Vaughn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Humboldt Co.
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    4,630
    Images
    40
    Sounds reasonable, Matt.

    The 6-element enlarging lenses sound just fine.
    I'd plan on hurrying up the TLR buying schedule. The bigger the negative, the smoother the tonality can be (everything else being equal, of course). There is just more real estate to spread the same image onto. You will easily see the difference between a 35mm and a 6x6 negs enlarged to 8x10 or 11x14. Way too much fun!

    But it can really wait. Exposing film, making prints, looking at photographs (yours and others), and enjoying the process is what is important.
    Vaughn
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  6. #36
    michaelbsc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    South Carolina
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,104
    Images
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by winger View Post
    I do use a tripod in more situations, but I see it as a plus because I should have used one more when shooting mainly 35mm.
    As someone here pointed out to me some years ago, because I was apparently too thick to recognize it myself, the sharpest lens in your camera bag is the tripod.
    Michael Batchelor
    Industrial Informatics, Inc.
    www.industrialinformatics.com

    The camera catches light. The photographer catches life.

  7. #37
    Wade D's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Jamul, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    881
    Images
    3
    Sticking with the 35mm format for now is a good choice as you hone your shooting and printing skills. Medium format can be quite cheap to get into once you're ready.
    My cameras are a Yashica D TLR and an Agfa Isolette folder. $60 for the Yashica and $45 for the Agfa with new bellows. Both were good finds and I'm glad I waited for them and not jumping at the 1st ones that came along.
    120 film can be cheap as well. $3 a roll (in a 5 pack) for the Fuji Acros 100 that I'm using now. I just started using it and so far I'm pleased with it.

  8. #38
    Wade D's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Jamul, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    881
    Images
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by tomalophicon View Post
    Get a 20x24 and be done with it.
    There's one on ebay for $11,000.

  9. #39
    keithwms's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Charlottesville, Virginia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,079
    Blog Entries
    20
    Images
    129
    LF most certainly is not the king! Not in my kingdom at least Look, there are different tools for different purposes. If I had to use LF for everything, well, I simply wouldn't have many of the shots I considered worth taking.

    Medium format is a great combination (not a compromise!) of the ergonomics and speed etc of 35mm with most of the detail and tonal charactersitics etc of the larger formats. if you know what you need, you'll very likely find it in medium format- it's the most diverse format, in terms of gear availability. View cameras, TLRs, RFs, SLRs, you name it... you can find it in medium format. It's also a format at the intersection of sheet and roll film, and instant film if you still use it. All of this can be quite handy.

    Let me put it this way, if you've settled into your niche and have clear projects in mind, then go ahead and settle on one format. But if you are experimenting and poking into this and that, then do not assume that any one format or piece of gear is best. Let the purpose guide you to the gear, not vice versa. And if you are uncertain, then there is no alternative to trying a lot of things out.

    I probably shouldn't comment further on LF so I don't ruffle too many feathers, but I'll just say that I've seen a lot of people engage in Ansel and Edward roleplay long before they have a clue what they will bring to the medium, rather than vice versa. Per described it as incest, and I think he was on to something.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

    [APUG Portfolio] [APUG Blog] [Website]

  10. #40

    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    660
    With regard to the original question: There are good ideas in this recent discussion in the following link about what can be accomplished with the 35mm format.

    Once you’ve mastered this relatively inexpensive format, should you find it limiting, then it makes sense to move to a larger film size.

    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum41/9...ate-about.html

Page 4 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin