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  1. #11

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    I'd just go with a hand held meter too you know, no slower than a built in meter really... and I'll also qualify my statement by saying that I'm pretty lazy

  2. #12
    keithwms's Avatar
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    I use a metering prism on the RB. But for best versatility, I'd just pick up a handheld meter, There might be a good hotshoe version that'd work for you too.

    Quote Originally Posted by RalphLambrecht View Post
    mamiya6
    Not cheap.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

    [APUG Portfolio] [APUG Blog] [Website]

  3. #13
    Aristophanes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by guitstik View Post
    What kind of cell phone do you have? I have several free light meter apps on my iPhone that work great.
    +1 to this. The app I uses I use (Light Meter and Fotometer Pro) are both highly accurate and very simple to use.

  4. #14

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    I have the AEII for my Bronica ETRS and it gives me excellent results. The later AEIII overcomes some of the limits of use of the II. I find the metered prism to be faster than using a handheld, as it converts the camera to AE mode.

    I find that I use my handheld meters about 75% of the time, easier to work with if wanting to be a bit more creative. I could easily live with the AEII full time due to results but to be creative requires adjusting the iso, etc., just easier to go handheld. Plus easier to go handheld if wanting to meter other than the area the in-camera meter covers which for me is very often.

    Considering the average price of most metered prisms, a hendhald can be had for bargain pricing and can be used with other cameras. I use mine to meter my dslr as the dslr is just too much information overload when using its meter, detracting from the composing and developing the emption of the photo taking experience.

    Neither of my meters cost over about $50 so it does not take big bucks to get an excellent meter; mine are are a Metrastar and Weston Ranger.

  5. #15

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    I don’t think there is any way to replace bulb metering with the camera’s internal meter. Maybe if you shoot landscapes with little contrast you will be fine but if you shoot portraits, backlight, details etc. a light meter is irreplaceable.

  6. #16

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    I will go for a handheld meter also.

    Jeff

  7. #17
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    I'd recommend a handheld meter, but if you want to look for a medium format camera with built in meter, I'd suggest a Mamiya 645e.

    In my mind, built in meters are most valuable if you do macro/close focus work.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  8. #18

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    I'm not sure what you are considering "cheap," but you can find Bronica SQ-A kits with ME prism for between $300-$400. Although it looks like you're leaning toward 6x7 and 645... then you'd have to add a 645 back for the SQ.

  9. #19
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    TTL prism meters for the 67 (new versions have an auto-off after 20 seconds) can often be found mint/new for around USD$350. They are surprisingly heavy though. You'll be carrying extra weight anyhow — by way of a handheld meter!
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  10. #20
    ParkerSmithPhoto's Avatar
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    A handheld meter will give you the ability to do both reflected and incident metering, as well as meter strobes. The Sekonic Flashmate is a great choice, inexpensive and the size of a deck of cards.


    A metered prism only gives you reflected readings, which are nearly useless in a studio. The handheld meter is a far more practical choice for the photographer.
    Parker Smith Photography, Inc.
    Atlanta, GA

    Commercial & Fine Art Photography
    Portrait Photography

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