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  1. #31

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    Nothing can replace incident metering. Really makes the difference for a perfectly exposed photo.

  2. #32

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    if you have to ... i'd go for handheld they appear here and on the auction site
    for not too much $ or as joel and others have suggested the app for your telephonic device ...

    it might be more helpful just to learn to read the light, much cheaper than a prism, or meter


    http://www.fredparker.com/ultexp1.htm

    have fun!
    john

  3. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by stavrosk View Post
    Nothing can replace incident metering. Really makes the difference for a perfectly exposed photo.
    Nothing can replace built in metering with AE and center weight. Really makes the difference between a decently exposed negative and a non existent perfectly exposed photo.

    This being said, the choice really depends on how you take pictures. If time is somewhat an issue then built in metering is good. If you have plenty of time then incident. I also find that TTL metering tends to be better and more convenient than reflective metering hand held.

  4. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by hnrh2 View Post
    If time is somewhat an issue then built in metering is good. If you have plenty of time then incident.
    Not at all. With incident you meter once and keep shooting until the light changes. There is no need to overcomplicate the matter really. Both incident and reflective metering can provide adequate starting points for an exposure, assuming you know how to meter.

    I prefer incident metering. I'm more in tune with the light that way. Once I sense that the intensity or direction of the light has changed I tend to make a guess at the new exposure and maybe reconfirm it with the incident meter. That might not be so easy with a reflective meter since your subject and hence the reflectance values you see have changed.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by hnrh2 View Post
    Nothing can replace built in metering with AE and center weight. Really makes the difference between a decently exposed negative and a non existent perfectly exposed photo.

    This being said, the choice really depends on how you take pictures. If time is somewhat an issue then built in metering is good. If you have plenty of time then incident. I also find that TTL metering tends to be better and more convenient than reflective metering hand held.
    While I do believe that good work can be done with any type of meter, the time needed to meter isn't really an issue unless we aren't paying attention.

    AE does have an advantage when we are grabbing a camera, that we have been ignoring, out of a bag to get a quick shot.

    But if I've got a camera close at hand because I think there's a shot handy, I will have done my metering the moment I walked in to that lighting situation.

    Three quick readings from the incident meter; front lit, cross lit, back lit, and I'm ready to run a whole roll in most any lighting situation without looking at a meter again. When I spot a shot, by the time my camera gets to my eye the exposure is set since it's normally just 1 or 2 clicks of the time knob/ring away.

    This pre measured style of shooting is really fast even with a fully manual or a MF camera as is the case with the OP.
    Last edited by markbarendt; 01-25-2012 at 05:26 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Clarity
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  6. #36
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    There is a time for incident metering, there is a time for reflective metering with an in-camera meter.

    I know well, and utilize, the benefits of incident metering. But imagine this situation...you are standing across the street in sunlight. You spot a fleeting event across the street, where the subject is in the shadow of the building which shields the sun from that side of the street. Incident metering is useless...not enough time to meter across the street and then run back to shoot. And standing in place while simply shielding the hemisphere from sun via your hand would be insufficient because of the bright light reflecting back to the hemisphere from the walls behind you, wrongly biasing the reading! A TTL meter in the camera would get the shot.

  7. #37
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    Incident metering = You have time.

    Reflective metering = You have opportunity.

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by wiltw View Post
    There is a time for incident metering, there is a time for reflective metering with an in-camera meter.

    I know well, and utilize, the benefits of incident metering. But imagine this situation...you are standing across the street in sunlight. You spot a fleeting event across the street, where the subject is in the shadow of the building which shields the sun from that side of the street. Incident metering is useless...not enough time to meter across the street and then run back to shoot. And standing in place while simply shielding the hemisphere from sun via your hand would be insufficient because of the bright light reflecting back to the hemisphere from the walls behind you, wrongly biasing the reading! A TTL meter in the camera would get the shot.
    No problem. Think zones.

    If your standing in sunny 16, the open shade setting across the street will be very close to f5.6 instead of f16, plus or minus personal bias. If it's cross lit a bit f8, fully cross lit f11.

    That's not a guess, if you know whats happening where you are you can generally figure out the rest very quickly.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  9. #39
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    That is a nice generalization. However, to illustrate the amount of error, I just measured at the back of my house in bright sunlight and while Sunny 16 held true (ISO 100, 1/100 f/16) in the sun; at the front of my house and in the shade shielded by the house, I measured between -4.4EV and -5.7EV difference in light depending upon exactly where I took the reading of the gray card...f/5.6 would have been wrong. Sunny 16 derivative says -4EV for open shade (f/4), but even that would be in error compared to what I measured.

  10. #40

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    There are a lot of options and from reading every single post in this thread I think I can safely conclude that it mostly depends how much one is used to their own metering device. learning one method well is probably going to save a shot for many.

    As for me, I am not used to metering, and I don't even know how to meter. never used a meter to begin with. I don't usually need a meter for pre-decided shoots as I have enough time at hand. For most quick shoots, I feel like I should go for a TTL, from what I have read so far, and seems like this is the least complicated. And lighting conditions can change very drastically in certain areas (unless I live in Colorado or Southern California). So if I have to keep metering then that will be a problem. I have sunny 16 down but I still get nervous every time I'm blindly setting my shutter speed. From experience I have realized that mot times it's better to over expose than under expose, but from time to time I have made mistakes.

    So yeah, I guess I will start with a TTL prism, and move from there.

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