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  1. #31
    JPD
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vanishing Point Ent. View Post
    The way it was explained to me when I owned a Rolleiflex 2.8 F Planar, was like this.

    Lens Name---------------------# of lens elements

    Schneider Xenar---------------3 elements,
    Zeiss Tessar-------------------4 elements, a symmetrical lens design,
    Schneider Xenotar-------------5 elements,
    Zeiss Planar--------------------6 elements.

    None of these are T*, or HFT coated.
    No, it's this way:

    Zeiss Triotar --- 3 elements
    Zeiss Tessar --- 4 elements
    Zeiss Planar 2.8 --- 5 elements
    Zeiss Planar 3.5 before ca 1960 --- 5 elements*
    Zeiss Planar 3.5 after ca 1960 --- 6 elements*

    Schneider Xenar --- 4 elements
    Schneider Xenotar 2.8 --- 5 elements
    Schneider Xenotar 3.5 before ca 1960 --- 5 elements*
    Schneider Xenotar 3.5 after ca 1960 --- 6 elements*

    *6 element lenses were used on the Rolleiflex 3.5 E3 and 3.5 F from the third model. The six element Planar and Xenotar aren't said to be better than the earlier five element versions, but the changed were made to make the production of the lenses cheaper. Not sure why, but it may have been that the grinding and polishing of some of the lens surfaces took longer time for the five element constructions.
    Last edited by JPD; 01-28-2012 at 08:58 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    J. Patric Dahlén

  2. #32
    JPD
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    The Schneider Xenar has never been 3 elements their triplet was the Trinar, the Zeiss Jena version was the Triotar and was fitted to early Rolei's.
    You mean Radionar. Trinar was a triplet from Rodenstock.
    J. Patric Dahlén

  3. #33
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JPD View Post
    You mean Radionar. Trinar was a triplet from Rodenstock.
    My mistake I have two Trinars one on a Rodenstock camera.

    Ian

  4. #34
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    From wikipedia

    The Tessar design patent was held by Zeiss for two decades, and licensed to Ross (optics) in the United Kingdom, Bausch & Lomb in the United States and to Krauss in France. Only licensed manufacturers were allowed to use the brand name "Tessar". However, Tessar-type lenses were widely made by many manufacturers under different trade names. The Minoxar 35/2.8 lens on the Minox M.D.C and GT-E is the fastest and widest Tessar type lens achieved so far by using lanthanum glass elements. The picture quality was outstanding.[2] Other Tessar-type lenses include the Schneider Xenar, Agfa Solinar, Rodenstock Ysar, Kodak Ektar, Yashica Yashinon 80mm (twin-lens-reflex design), and Minolta Rokkor 75mm (twin-lens-reflex design).
    FYI -
    Kodak Ektars are not all Tessar type designs.

    See:
    http://www.bnphoto.org/bnphoto/KodakEktarsDB1.htm

    And, not all 4 element lenses are really Tessar designs either (not that anyone here said they were):
    http://www.bnphoto.org/bnphoto/KodakLensDesign1.htm
    Last edited by BobD; 01-28-2012 at 08:15 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  5. #35
    Richard Sintchak (rich815)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JPD View Post
    You mean Radionar. Trinar was a triplet from Rodenstock.
    Wow, I did not know Radionars were triplets. This is one of the sharpest images I've ever shot. Color me a triplet fan now:

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/38698047@N00/5763228802
    -----------------------

    "Well, my photos are actually much better than they look..."

    Richard S.
    Albany, CA (San Francisco bay area)

    My Flickr River of photographs
    http://flickriver.com/photos/rich815...r-interesting/

    My Photography Website
    http://www.lightshadowandtone.com

  6. #36
    John Austin's Avatar
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    I personally feel this thread has gone on too long - Any further posts should be from people who can identify which images are made through these two lenses from 20x16" prints

    I know I could not tell the difference from good prints

  7. #37
    JPD
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    Quote Originally Posted by rich815 View Post
    Wow, I did not know Radionars were triplets. This is one of the sharpest images I've ever shot. Color me a triplet fan now:

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/38698047@N00/5763228802
    Very sharp indeed! Schneider Radionar, Zeiss Triotar and Meyer Trioplan are very good three element lenses, and there's no need to stay away from them if you don't need perfect sharpness in the outermost corners. You used a Radionar for 6x9 on your 6x6 camera, so you only used the center, and you can see how good three element lenses can be.
    J. Patric Dahlén

  8. #38
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    I had a Meyer Trioplan of around 100mm that I found for cheap. I took a few shots with it but didn't look at them and I sold the lens thinking it couldn't be very good with only 3 elements. Then, later I saw the photos and wished I'd kept it. It's a very nice, sharp lens with wonderful color rendition.

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