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  1. #11

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    I absolutely love shooting E100G. It seems to have almost as much color as E100VS with noticibly less grain. I shoot 99% of my slides in an EOS 3, using the camera's meter. Exposure is almost always dead on for me when I shoot at its rated 100 ISO. Occasionally, I'll bracket -1/3 or-2/3 stop to take advantage of the extra color saturation, though in most cases it turns out not to provide any advantage.

    Also, scans are much easier if the slides aren't underexposed.

  2. #12

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    You should get yourself a light table and a loupe, or a projector for slides. Projected slides are amazing.

    ME Super

  3. #13

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    Pick a nice sunny, totally cloudless California day. Put the film in the camera. Go outdoors between the hours of 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. and make a series of photographs rating the film from +1 to -1 in 1/2 or 1/3 stop increments in a variety of locations and situations, from full shade to full sun. Carefully record your exposures. Develop the film normally and choose the best exposures. Rate your film accordingly for your own personal exposure index. Everybody meters and exposes differently, this will be "your" film test.

    Peter Gomena

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by pgomena View Post
    Pick a nice sunny, totally cloudless California day. Put the film in the camera. Go outdoors between the hours of 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. and make a series of photographs rating the film from +1 to -1 in 1/2 or 1/3 stop increments in a variety of locations and situations, from full shade to full sun. Carefully record your exposures. Develop the film normally and choose the best exposures. Rate your film accordingly for your own personal exposure index. Everybody meters and exposes differently, this will be "your" film test.

    Peter Gomena
    Absolutely: you can't really determine a good rating for the film until you have a pretty clear idea of the precision of the camera metering, and the direction of any divergence from dead accurate.

  5. #15

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    I shot good old Kodachrome 64 for years at 80 for projection.
    Experiment and see what YOU like best.
    Best regards,
    /Clay

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by macrorie View Post
    Absolutely: you can't really determine a good rating for the film until you have a pretty clear idea of the precision of the camera metering, and the direction of any divergence from dead accurate.
    And, in fact, even if it's an unmetered camera and/or you're using a hand meter, you still have to test with each camera (or at least lens) that you intend to use, since different lenses will yield different results (as far as, e.g., saturation) with the same film, depending on coatings, etc. Shooting box speed and +1 to -1 in 1/3-stop increments unfortunately will cost you a whole roll (except one shot left for a picture of the cat) when doing this with a 6 x 9 folder at 8 pictures to a roll--assuming it can even do 1/3-stop increments. So obviously not something you'll want to do in too great a variety of locations and situations, but must do some. You can't assume the results you got with a modern, multicoated, 8-element SLR lens are at all instructive as to what you'll get with an uncoated 1937 Tessar. (Obviously I have a particular one of my cameras in mind here...)
    --Dave

  7. #17

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    I shoot box speed. If there is a bright object in frame I take it down 1/2 stop. If it's a fairly bright object I take it down a full stop. I usually don't like to overexpose negative film either, I like creamy detailed highlights and crushed shadows. People overexpose to get shadow detail, but you're shooting film after all--why make it look like digital?

  8. #18

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    Though not a user of Kodak film, my exposures for all (Velvia) stock is +0.3 to +0.7 (polarised, diffuse light) and never any under-exposure. Slides for projection have a WOW! factor if slightly underexposed, but for printing, more care is required.

    Latterly on 6x7 I spot-meter with an L758 in marginal lighting that I cannot avoid shooting in; at other times in the right light I let the camera's meter take care of it. For most practical purposes, shooting film at box speed will suffice, but understanding where slight over-exposure is desirable in specific lighting is invaluable, and this can only be achieved by actively exposing film in many different situations and recording notes of the exposure as you go.

  9. #19

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    While all are offering good advice, I wonder what metering and camera you are using. With negative you meter for the dark and let the highlights fall where they will while with slides, expose for the highlights and let the darks fall where they will. This of course works best if you have either a spot meter or a non grey scale reading meter such as the SEI. Also, while not quite designed for it a meter modified for the Zone System such as the Weston Ranger and Pentax spot meter and others helps as you can take the reading and knowing the curve of the film read the Zone directly from the scale.

    I've found in the past when adjusting the film iso, the reality is you are trying to adjust the meter to move the meter's grey reading to a higher Zone which works generally well provided the testing to find the iso adjustment includes a range up to Zone X.

    I have the SEI and Weston with the Zone dial and have found in the past when using either meter the box iso is good. Seldom need ot think it might have been better exposure wise than what the meters read. With my incamera meter I usually have to bring the iso down to get the result. So, what to do depends on the equipment.

  10. #20
    Jaime Marin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianL View Post
    I wonder what metering and camera you are using.
    Sekonic l358 and a Mamiya 7

    Thanks everyone for the suggestions Im gonna try it out and see how it goes

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