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  1. #1
    Jaime Marin's Avatar
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    New to shooting slides

    Ill be shooting some slides for the first time, specifically the Kodak E100G. I remember once reading that these are a bit trickier to expose and I think I remember reading that some people over expose on purpose by like a stop? Anyways anybody got any tips for me before I shoot?

  2. #2

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    I bracket my slide exposures between -2, 0, and +2. From those three, there's generally something I like.

  3. #3
    jun
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    Normally, unless you know what you are archiving by overexposing your favorite E6 film one stop, it is generally not recommended to deliberately overexpose E6 (reversal) film.

    I bet your comment "over expose on purpose by like a stop" applies to C41 films not for E6 films.

  4. #4
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Increased exposure is helpful for negatives, but hurtful for slides.

    Actually, there are some similarities between digital work and slides, because blown-out highlights are the most common errors in both.

    You need to evaluate your exposure carefully, because you have relatively low latitude available.

    I tend to prefer slight underexposure for slides, but then I aim for projection more than printing.

    This was shot on slide film and metered carefully:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails MattKing-Fungi and Fallen-Image02h.jpg  
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  5. #5
    DanielStone's Avatar
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    I've found that rating E100G @ 80asa(iso) gives me better shadow detail, and the highlights still retain good detail. Or if you expose at box speed, getting a 1/3 stop push as a "standard" can definitely help too.

    Try shooting a roll @80, and another roll @100. Compare(scan, project, however you plan to present/work with them) and see what gives you the results you're after.

    E100G is a terrific film btw! Use it while its here...

    -Dan

  6. #6
    Slixtiesix's Avatar
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    Slide film is just great. The only thing I regret is that I hadn´t started shooting it years ago!
    Overexposing slides will give better shadow detail, but in most cases you will end up with blown out highlights and pictures that are dull overall. Like the others, I would recommend some bracketing to start. Box speed, +- 1/2, 1 and 2 stops and you will get an impression of what slide film is capable. Since the latitude of slide film is rather narrow, I would also recommend to choose some scenes that are not too contrasty for the beginning, and do not include shadow areas at all. Careful metering is needed, best done with the incident method, which always worked great for me.

  7. #7

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    Like with all media bad photography will look bad whether shot on negative or slide. An image with low contrast, intense colors and properly exposed will look nice on slide film as would look nice on my iPhone camera.

  8. #8
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DanielStone View Post
    E100G is a terrific film btw! Use it while its here...

    -Dan
    +1. It's somewhat consoling to have E100G available since Fuji discontinued Astia. Astia is probably my favorite modern transparency film, but E100G is excellent.

  9. #9
    Rick A's Avatar
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    I've always treated transparency film the opposite of negative film. While is's beneficial to overexpose negativees somewhat, it has a detrimental affect to slides. Slight underexposure can intensify colors some, I generally shoot box speed and meter bright areas and try to expose so they aren't blown out.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum
    BTW: the big kid in my avatar is my hero, my son, who proudly serves us in the Navy. "SALUTE"

  10. #10

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    What Dan said.

    I switched to E100G back in 2005 after Kodak took Kodachrome 25 away. Since that time I have rated E100G at EI 80 and have gotten consistently good results.

    Hal

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