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  1. #1
    brian steinberger's Avatar
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    Hasselblad Lens for Still Life Photography?

    I'm looking to begin shooting some still life photography. I've been going to flea markets/antique shops and am getting some interesting objects. I have the 80/2.8 CF lens, but no extension tubes. Would I be better off with a bit of a longer focal length, say 120 or 150? Or stick with my 80 and get extension tubes?

    Recommendations? Suggestions? Examples welcome!

  2. #2
    Jim Noel's Avatar
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    Extension tubes are necessary if you are to focus close. If you buy a 120 or 150mm lens you still will need teh tubes for close work.
    Jim
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

  3. #3
    brian steinberger's Avatar
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    Thanks Jim. How about focal length? I would think the 80 would allow a little more flexibility into shooting, it's slightly wider and offers a 2.8 aperture. Thoughts?

  4. #4
    segedi's Avatar
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    I have the 80mm, 150mm and the 8 and 16mm extension tubes. If you can only get one extension tube, I'd recommend the 8mm, seems small, but it does the trick for closer focusing. Unless your still life subjects are really small.

    The 80mm is a great starting point and I think it will solve most of your needs. The f/2.8 vs. f/4 of some of the longer lengths is a bit moot. For still lifes, you're most likely going to want to shoot between f/8 and 16 anyway. The shallower depth of field with medium format makes an f/2.8 much like an f/1.4 in 35mm format.
    -----------------------

    Segedi.com

  5. #5
    naeroscatu's Avatar
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    Brian, here is some still life I shot in my livingroom with the 150mm Sonnar. No extension tubes needed here but it is good to have them for flexibility.Click image for larger version. 

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    Mihai Costea

    "There's more to the picture
    Than meets the eye." - Neil Young

    Galleries:My PN & My APUG

  6. #6
    ruilourosa's Avatar
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    120 or 135, macro designs, high resolution at closer focus range... they work at their best at 1:1 - 1:5 ratios
    vive la resistance!

  7. #7
    Leigh B's Avatar
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    The 120 Makro Planar is an excellent choice. It will focus down to 0.8m (1:4.5 magnification) on its own. With the 32mm extension tube it goes down to 1:2.
    Don't use shorter extension tubes, they buy you very little. It's designed for the 32mm.

    Avoid the 135mm lens. It has no focusing helicoid. It's designed to be used with a bellows, and won't work without one ($$$). Excellent lens however.

    I have both the 120mm and the 150mm, and use the 120mm for close subjects almost exclusively.

    BTW, a comment on lens "optimization".
    Many lenses, particularly those for close work, are said to be optimized for a particular range of magnifications, like "2:1 to 1:10" or some such.
    This does NOT imply that the lens will fail to perform satisfactory when used at other distances.
    Most Makro lenses, and particularly the Hasselblad 120mm Makro, are stellar with all subjects.

    - Leigh
    Last edited by Leigh B; 03-12-2012 at 06:29 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    “Wise men talk because they have something to say; fools, because they have to say something.” - Plato

  8. #8
    brian steinberger's Avatar
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    Thanks guys for the responses. The example posted above is very similar to what I'm looking to do. I'm not going to be doing true macro stuff, and the 120 makro is quite expensive. I may just purchase an extension tube for now for my 80 and see how it goes. If I find I need more focal length and closer focusing then I may look into the 120.

  9. #9
    ruilourosa's Avatar
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    you have older models that might be cheaper!
    vive la resistance!

  10. #10
    Slixtiesix's Avatar
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    Yes, the old S-Planar 120/5,6 is just as good as the Macro Planar. MTF indicates it is even better in the close up range in fact. These can be had at bargain prices today. Just make sure the shutter works properly. This lens has very high resolution and picture quality is very even across the frame. No distortion also. Bokeh is nice too.
    (These birds have a size of about an inch.)

    Click image for larger version. 

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