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  1. #11

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    Find a good, used 500c/m with an 80mm lens and a back. If you buy it at a reasonable price, you can sell it for about the same amount if you don't like it. As others said, buy the newer CF lenses. The older ones are fine, optically speaking, but parts for the shutters are no longer made. Then save you pennies for another back, another lens or two, and the inevitable servicing and repairs.

    Peter Gomena

  2. #12
    S.larsson's Avatar
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    Ah fair enough, I shoot mostly Landscapes/Cityscapes and Street/Docu photography.

  3. #13
    S.larsson's Avatar
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    @ Agfarapid, I know what a C330 is but what's an RB/RZ? Cheers

  4. #14
    GKR1's Avatar
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    Who ever says get something else than the blad either has not owned one or has no clue. LOL They are work horses, keep their value and are in demand.

    Get the 501C. For landscapes and street its great. Just add the 50mm lens to your kit, stay with CF T* lenses causes they share the same bay 60mm for filters. 40mm and SWC could an be addition down the road.

  5. #15

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    Nov 2011
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    By RB/RZ he means the Mamiya RB67 and RZ67. The RB67 is manual and RZ67 is electronic, but otherwise they are very similar cameras. They are very good in all aspects but weight.

  6. #16

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    For landscapes/cityscapes, Hasselblad is hard to beat. For street work, I'd probably be looking more at a Mamiya 6 or 7 though. I had a 503cx, fantastic on a tripod, but I'm unconvinced about using handheld.

  7. #17
    DanielStone's Avatar
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    Having *owned* an RB67 and RZ67 kits in the recent past, and now having chosen the Hasselblad, here's some pro's and cons from my POV.

    Positives(IMO) *for Hasselblad*
    Lighter in weight than the RB/RZ system
    Smaller footprint(size) than the RB/RZ
    No batteries(unless you have a motorized body, such as a 500ELX, 553elx, etc...). The RB67 is also fully mechanical
    Lenses are smaller(but not necessarily lighter)
    Lenses are slightly lower in contrast(IMO) than Mamiya glass. I shoot chromes, so this helps tame contrast a bit.
    Rentals are still available for lenses/bodies, etc.. in many major cities worldwide(if needed)

    Negatives(IMO) *For Hasselblad*
    Much more expensive(usually 1.5-2x more). Almost everything is this way pricing-wise.
    Smaller negative. Having a 6x7cm negative/chrome allows one the "ideal" format, and you can always crop it square in post/printing/scanning.

    Positives(IMO) *For Mamiya*
    Relatively inexpensive to build a nice system
    Cheaper accessories (cost-wise)
    Rentals are still available for lenses/bodies, etc.. in many major cities worldwide(if needed) (this is relating to the RZ lineup, not many places(if any) RENT RB67 equipment)
    Higher contrast lenses(good if you shoot lots of b/w and like more "bite" straight out of the film. This is from my experience.
    6x7 is the "ideal" format
    Interchangeable lenses(RB lenses work on both RB and RZ lenses, RZ only on RZ bodies)
    Bellows focusing(good for close-up w/o having to use supplementary extension rings most of the time)

    Negatives(IMO) *For Mamiya*
    -Heavier
    -Bulkier
    -Takes batteries(RZ67 line of bodies). Shooting in the field, and not having a fresh battery can be a real buzzkill for a landscaper(like myself). I'm speaking from experience here
    -Bellows focusing(good for close-up w/o having to use supplementary extension rings most of the time). Have you any experience with a view camera? Bellows extension means you'll have to do exposure adjustment if focusing closer than infinity. The scales on the side aren't very clear IMO.
    -10 shots/roll for 120 vs 12 for the Hasselblad(6x6). But you get the "ideal" format

    hope this might clear some things up? I'm sure there's other things, but pro's and con's are subjective, and vary from user to user. These are just my major ones for each system.

    -Dan


  8. #18

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    Jan 2011
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    my "ideal" format is square, period. but that's me
    I have had a yashica TLR for years like you, then decided to get something more "serious"
    I considered a Hasselblad, too, but it just looked a bit overpriced, price/performance-wise. That's why I got a Rollei (6000 series) for a very reasonable price. Never looked back (actually now I have 2 of them, a 6003 and a 6008). yes, it's an electronic camera, but reliable as hell. i also do time exposures with it (15+ min), no problems so far with the battery etc. It is a bit bulkier than a basic Hassy, but I like it more.
    I know quite a few people using a Mamiya-nice camera at the half the cost of a Hassy/Rollei, but quite bulky, and I just don't like the 6x7 format
    but there is a problem with a Rollei camera-where I went (in a populated place), there were people staring at me (well, the camera)-probably it's not the right tool for candid shots but I try to consider this as a privilege: if a Hassy is considered a Mercedes in the camera world, then a Rollei should be a Bentley

  9. #19
    ChristopherCoy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by T-grain View Post
    if a Hassy is considered a Mercedes in the camera world, then a Rollei should be a Bentley

    I thought it was the other way around? Mercedes are cheaper than Bentleys, therefore you'd be driving the C class... Right? LOL

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by ChristopherCoy View Post
    I thought it was the other way around? Mercedes are cheaper than Bentleys, therefore you'd be driving the C class... Right? LOL
    well, not quite...the problem is that second-hand "Bentleys" are underpriced (luckily), but they come fully accessorized
    on the contrary the "Mercedes" hold price better, due to popularity-but if you want to get a fully equipped "Mercedes" it costs easily as much as a "standard Bentley"
    but I wouldn't be surprised if people spend more on a used C-class compared to a well-kept Bentley because they are afraid of maintenance

    anyway, I think we all should thank the majority of consumers/prosumers to have switched to d*****l, so the prices dropped dramatically, by an order of magnitude-medium format has never been so affordable
    I have 2 bodies, 3 lenses, a bunch of accessories: in the old good days that was a fortune (like a mid-high class car, say about 20 grand), but I have spent less than for a 5D MKII.....body only of course

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