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  1. #11
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cinejerk View Post
    Hi Steven

    Yep, I now know about the little plastic wedge.
    But I thought there was a difference in the film pressure plate
    to make up the difference of the paper backing thickness?
    The difference in the pressure plate is there as much to protect the insert as it is to ensure flat film - 120 film puts more pressure on the plate's springs.

    It is the film gate that plays the most important roll in ensuring that the film is where it belongs.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  2. #12

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    Hello;
    I just pulled out my inserts and made a close inspection. The springs appear to have the same tension. The 220 insert has two grooves machined in the pressure plate about the depth of paper backing to allow this to drop into the film channel. The 120 insert is flat across the pressure plate. Hope this helps, Steven.

  3. #13
    cinejerk's Avatar
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    I see what you mean about those grooves snederhiser. I wonder what those do? Hold the backingless film closer to the rails?

    I don't really plan to run 120 film in my 220 insert. I am going to try to make sort of 220 half rolls. Cut the backing paper just after the film starts and then tape the end of the paper on the end for a trailer.

    Since I can't find fresh 220 film other than color neg I don't really have a choice with the 220 insert.
    I don't really like the paper backing on 120 film anyway.

    As far as processing problems goes I plan on doing all my own. Can't find anyone worth a hoot locally anyway.

  4. #14
    cinejerk's Avatar
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    120 in a 220 insert

    Well ran my first roll of 120 film through my 220 insert yesterday.

    220 is getting so difficult to find anymore. I know I should just get a 120 insert but...

    For some reason I just don't like the idea of the paper backing all the way through.

    I removed the little plastic wedge that controls the counting dial. Then I cut the paper

    behind the leader tape and remove all the paper behind the film. Then taped on a trailer

    piece at the end of the film. Worked perfectly.

    Why do I do things like this? Innovation? Probably not !! Just cheap? Probably.

    I guess I was always one that likes to buck the system.

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