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  1. #1
    Andy K's Avatar
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    Kodak Box Brownie, Filmspeed?

    I found a Kodak No. 2 Brownie Model E in a charity shop today. I think it'd be fun to put a roll through it. The camera has a fixed shutter speed and aperture, neither of which I know. So, what would be a good film speed to use?


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  2. #2
    ann
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    most of these type cameras are based on the sunny 16 rule. so , probably 125/11 or F 16. Remember , or perhaps you are too young, the directions indicated one was to stand with the sun behind the photographer usually with the sun behind one shoulder or the other. Very few options when it came to film types for the average household so i would quess a medium speed film with perhaps something faster for overcast dull days.

  3. #3

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    I'm not sure how one would rate the film, but that camera actually has a variable aperture (3 choices) and a bulb type setting for longer exposures.

    There are two tabs located on the top of the camera to change these settings.

    Looking down on the camera top as if you were going to compose a scene through the viewfinder, the left-most tab is the on/off toggle for the shutter's time exposure setting. Pull the tab up and the shutter will open when the shutter release lever is moved downward. It will close when the shutter release lever is returned to its original position.

    To change the aperture, pull the wide tab located midway between the time-exposure tab and the viewfinder window.

    There are three settings, the smallest of which is selected when the tab is fully extended. There is a crude detent midway that lets you know when the tab is in the proper position to line up the aperture and the lens opening.

    To get a feel for where they are located, you can shift the shutter lever tab to its time-exposure setting (extended) and open the shutter (please, no film in the camera yet!) and see for yourself the different sized apertures that are selected as you pull out the aperture tab. Feel for that midpoint detent as you slide the tab in and out. Otherwise, fully extended is the smallest aperture and flush with the camera top is the widest aperture.

  4. #4

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    Mike I see Ann has already summed it up very well with those vintage beasties. All I'll add is I have a Bencini Koroll 24 from the early 50's. It takes 120 film and is F11 (ish) or bulb and 1/50th (ish) fixed. The main thing is just go out and enjoy yourself without all the trappings of modern technology. I'm sure we're looking forward to seeing your results - Happy shooting

  5. #5
    Andy K's Avatar
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    Mike? Who's Mike? Lol!

    Thanks for the info people, I just found the tabs mentioned (I thought they were part of the construction holding the camera together!). I see the three apertures and the 'B' setting works.

    For those interested it has two viewfinders, one on top for 'portrait' layout and one on the side for 'landscape'.

    I figure I'll get some FP4 to try it out. I think the camera was made around 1916, as that is the last Patent date stamped on the inner chassis. Before I use it I'll have to sort out some light seal, but that's an easy job.


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  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy K
    Mike? Who's Mike? Lol!
    Oooooops sorry Fred ... errrm ... Eddy ... errrm ... ... errrm ... arrrhhhh ... Andy ... one of those days LOL

  7. #7
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    I would suggest 100 speed film. I shoot a kodak hawkeye brownie on occasion and use 100 speed color negative film and have it developed only at my local lab (these go on to become digital negatives.......). I find that the latitute of color negative film is so huge these days that I can just drop the 100 speed in and shoot regardless of the light. I do the same thing with 400 speed in a holga.
    Let's see what I've got in the magic trash can for Mateo!

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