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  1. #11

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    I love the lab shop comment "was it shot on a Hasselblad". In my experience, my 124 has consistently outgunned my 501CM in terms of sharpness. I find it a whole lot easier to focus, which goes counter to what I had originally expected after hearing such glowing praise of the split/prism accutematte finder on the 'blad (which, for me anyways, tends to be a whole lot harder to achieve critical focus with than the much lower-tech ground glass in the 124).

    Agree about the colors on the slides, they look off. No way to know if it's the scans or the slides without seeing the actual slides.

  2. #12
    sandermarijn's Avatar
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    Velvia (50) has always scanned terribly on my Epson flatbed. Contrast is more than the scanner can handle and the colours go purplish. I think the OP's scans look pretty good, considering.

  3. #13
    Tony-S's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Metricon View Post
    All of the metering was done through the camera's built-in light meter which is powered by the original 1.5 volt mercury battery.
    If you're really shooting with a 1.5V battery and your ASA dial is set to 50, then you're really shooting around ASA 20.
    Last edited by Tony-S; 04-12-2012 at 04:11 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  4. #14
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    If metrico is anywhere near to me in the UK I'd be quite happy to check the camera over and the meter. It might be sensible to for someone with experience to help elininate/diagnose any issue. I just found my first MF negs shot with a 124G back in 1970

    Ian

  5. #15

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    Thank you all for your comments, thoughts, opinions and suggestions! I've looked at the slides again (unfortunately no lightbox or loupe, but I used a reversed 58mm lens that I had handy and the light from my computer screen) and the colours couldn't have been more lifelike. I felt almost as if I was there at the scene again! I guess I was so thrown off by the scans that I didn't pay enough attention to the slides at first, especially as trying to examine them closely without a proper loupe isn't easy to do. Also, not having used slide film before, I wasn't sure whether focus problems would be obvious just by looking at the slides. Anyone know what degree of magnification is afforded by a reversed 58mm lens? In any case, a light box and a proper loupe is now on my shopping list!

    So, in retrospect I doubt there was anything wrong with the exposures except for shot #1 (f 5.6, 1/250, BTW) where it's true that the focus is on the grass and not on the trees. DaveT, you're right! I can't remember whether that was the effect I'd aimed for or not...

    In shot #3 (the one with the church and the graveyard), I focused on the sunlit wall of the church, near the corner. I shot at f8, 1/30 sec and used a cable release to fire the shutter so that there was no discernible camera movement. When examining the slides, the church wall looks to be in focus and so do the branches right in front of the wall but the gravestones begin to be out of focus which is what I'd intended.

    Beginner's error: I think one thing I overlooked when trying to judge DOF is the difference between viewing and taking lens. I realise now that you can't accurately preview DOF on the Yashica Mat's focusing screen, presumably because the focusing lens is F2.8 whereas the taking lens is F3.5?

    I did take an awful lot of time trying to get the focus right, so long in fact that I worried I might wear the battery down, ha ha! (Fabrizio, you're right of course about the mercury battery, it is 1.3V rather than 1.5). Even with the supplied "Sportsfinder" aid (described in the user's manual as a "magnifying lens for critical focusing") I didn't find focusing on the 124G particularly easy but then I haven't got any other medium format cameras to compare it to. Matt, would a focus correction diopter be installed on top of the normal focusing screen or in its place? How would I know one if I saw one?

    Well, so much for using professional labs to have your film scanned! Though in all fairness Genie Imaging are probably the cheapest in the UK for E6... One frame is ruined by a couple of scratches on the emulsion and there's also what looks like a light leak on the right hand corner of the last frame (the church and graveyard image) which is there right on the slide...

    Ian, thank you for your kind offer but unfortunately I'm nowhere near you.

    EDIT: To make sure there's nothing wrong with the camera, I think some more testing might be in order. Perhaps with simpler subjects where focusing and depth of field are more straightforward to evaluate afterwards.
    Last edited by Metricon; 04-12-2012 at 04:34 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: disambiguation

  6. #16
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Metricon View Post
    Even with the supplied "Sportsfinder" aid (described in the user's manual as a "magnifying lens for critical focusing") I didn't find focusing on the 124G particularly easy but then I haven't got any other medium format cameras to compare it to. Matt, would a focus correction diopter be installed on top of the normal focusing screen or in its place? How would I know one if I saw one?.
    Metricon:

    First, I forgot to welcome you to APUG. So ... Welcome!

    The "Sportfinder" is actually a separate item from the magnifying lens for critical focusing. Yashica just combined the release for that magnifying lens with the Sportfinder latch. The Magnifying lens is where one would find a focus correction diopter, if one was installed. I don't know if that accessory is available for your camera.

    I use the magnifying lens for most focusing on my waist level finder cameras.

    In case you don't have it, you can find a manual for your camera on Mike Butkus' site here: http://www.butkus.org/chinon/yashica...a_mat_124g.htm

    I recommend sending him his requested donation.

    Have fun with your camera.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  7. #17

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    Hi Matt, I've got the manual and yes you're right, I amalgamated the magnifying lens and the sportsfinder in my account! The sportsfinder is not the magnifying lens, it's the frame incorporated in the viewfinder hood. From what I've seen, a focus correction diopter doesn't seem to feature among the accessories available for this camera. I read a thread about a Rolleicord in which someone mentioned that every Rollei diopter he'd seen had the designation clearly printed on the top, e.g. "+1".

  8. #18

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    Wow, this thread is exactly what I love about apug.

    A guy is doing a combination of things that are new and unfamiliar to him and asks for help. A bunch of guys who really know what their doing quickly analyze it to death and tell him where several parts of his process went wrong (as well as what didn't), and how to correct them. Then the guy comes back to tell how startlingly accurate that advise was. The rest of us get a free photography lesson.

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