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  1. #1

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    Considering a Mamiya rb67 Pro s

    Hello,
    I am considering a Mamiya rb67 pro s because of the rotating back.
    I do not however understand the concept ot inserting a black card or hat in front of the lens before the exposure to lock the miror or to end the metering and terminate the exposure reducing the miror shake on long/and short exposures.
    Unless a black card can be inserted quickly in front of the lens to terminate the metering would not this show a partly blocked photo?
    Please excuse my ignorance but this is something that I do not understand and I would have no one to materially show me how this works.
    Understanding the concept would help me tremendously.
    Are there any books available that shows how to take photos with the rb67 pro s other than just the users manual?
    Thanks
    Ronald

  2. #2
    djhopscotch's Avatar
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    With the rb system to pre lock the mirror you set the lens to mirror up, fire the shutter release on the body to lock the mirror. The use a shutter cable to fire the shutter in the lens. No card or hat is needed.

    Sent using Tapatalk

  3. #3
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Nothing to do with the mirror.

    The lenses have a strange way of doing long exposures. Rather than the more common B setting where the shutter stays open all the time the shutter button is pressed, when set to T, The RB 67 lenses require the shutter to be pressed to open the shutter then the speed dial needs to be rotated or the shutter cocked to close the shutter.

    Some people advocate blocking the lens with a black card before closing the shutter to minimise any shake. The longer the exposure, the less of a problem this will be.


    Steve.

  4. #4
    CGW
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    The good dj told the tale. It's a very simple, effective procedure made easier by the two-step mechanism. All you need is a regular cable release to screw into the lens. Mamiya makes a fancy-schmancy double barrel cable release that does the mirror-up/shutter release with one stroke but it's no big deal to do the mirror-up with the main shutter button, then trip the shutter with the cable release. It's just a rhythm thing, like the shutter cock/film advance two-step.

    It's a very cool system camera. The rotating back and no-sweat close-up capability are what sold me, along with the big 6x7 negatives/transparencies. These, together with very straightforward operation, more than outweigh its size and heft.

  5. #5
    CGW
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    Nothing to do with the mirror.

    The lenses have a strange way of doing long exposures. Rather than the more common B setting where the shutter stays open all the time the shutter button is pressed, when set to T, The RB 67 lenses require the shutter to be pressed to open the shutter then the speed dial needs to be rotated or the shutter cocked to close the shutter.

    Some people advocate blocking the lens with a black card before closing the shutter to minimise any shake. The longer the exposure, the less of a problem this will be.


    Steve.
    KL lenses have separate releases for mirror-up and B shutter closing on their T setting.

  6. #6
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    I know. I was addressing the OP's concerns about advice he had acquired for using a black card or hat. This relates to closing the shutter after a timed exposure and has nothing to do with the mirror lockup (although mirror lockup will probably be used as well in this situation).


    Steve.

  7. #7

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    There are a few very helpful Youtube videos out there. I just picked up an RB67 myself and they were great visual learning tools.

  8. #8

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    Thanks Guys for some good info.
    Are there manuals better than the one that came with the camera?
    Or do you feel that it pretty well covers everything?
    Ronald

  9. #9
    CGW
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    Quote Originally Posted by RonaldD View Post
    Thanks Guys for some good info.
    Are there manuals better than the one that came with the camera?
    Or do you feel that it pretty well covers everything?
    Ronald
    It covers what you'll need in terms of functional/operational stuff--film loading, exposure comp./DOF calculations, RB functions, lens changing. It's a very straightforward, mechanical camera. Think it took about 15 minutes to figure it out. If get one, come back with questions. Lots of RB shooters around and at least one tech guru, too.

  10. #10

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    One thing about mirror up photos with the RB

    This is not an answer to your question, but just a tip that you will have to learn if you do mirror up exposures with the RB. After taking your first shot with the mirror up, it is tempting to just cock the camera and fire away. However, doing so does not cock the shutter. You will think you are taking a picture but you are not. This is easier to understand by taking a few shots with no film in the camera, (you will have to have the multiple exposure lever in the forward position) and put the shutter on a slow speed like 1/15th. You will hear the gears move the first time an exposure is made, but just cocking and firing the camera will not make the escapement sound. You will have to put the MU (mirror up) lever back and cock the camera. I have probably confused you, but just wanted you to watch for this. Ric.

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