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  1. #1

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    Which pelican case for MF

    Had a MONSTER scare today. We took our boat out for the first time this year. I decided to take my digi thing along with my Hartblei (K88). I have never carried a camera on the boat before. Both fit nice in a Domke bag. Going through a narrow area (Lake powell) we met a Large cabin cruiser going the opposite way. We got dropped into their wake pretty hard and the bow was swamped, so was the domke bag. We got the cameras out ASAP before any water got in but I would have been much happier if there was not a threat.

    So, pelican case users, what case are you using? I want to carry one hartblei body, with prism finder attached. Three lenses, two film backs, film, and the Nikon D80.

    The pelican site is set up with colors I cannot see, so finding something on the site is proving to be frustrating.

    Except for the swamping it was a great day.
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  2. #2
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    Take a look at these cases.

    http://www.plaber.com/

    I own 2 for my LF cameras.

  3. #3

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    Don't over complicate this.
    Lay out all of your equipment you want to carry, in one case, in one layer.
    Leave about an inch between each piece of equipment.
    Then add about an inch to all four outer sides, and to the top and bottom of your tallest piece.
    The figures you come up with will be the minimum inside measurement of any case your looking for.

  4. #4
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    A Pelican 1520 will hold a Rolleiflex and a meter plus a 35mm camera and a flash. There's enough room left over to make a compartment for extra rolls of film or to hold a few tchotchkes if you want to.
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

    -----

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  5. #5

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    Made this a few weeks ago. Might give you some ideas. Bought the case from an electronics discount store and bought the foam infill material from the local retail rubber/foam shop.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Leica M6,
    Bessa R4A,
    Rolleiflex(s) 2.8/80, 4/135, 4/55.
    Nikkormat FTn
    Fuji X10

  6. #6
    ozphoto's Avatar
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    I picked up a German version here in Bangkok - can't remember it's brand and I'm on a shoot until the 25th. Was cheaper than a Pelican, but operates in a similar fashion with the release valve etc.

  7. #7

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    I've gone through a few hard cases, the only ones that have survived are the pelican cases. My old Hardig and storm cases have failed either with cracks or broken latches. Needless to say I only buy Pelican when I need a hard case.

  8. #8
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    Pelican cases are both U.S. Mil-Spec and STANAG. (NATO standard testing agreement.)

    They have to be dropped from a height of one meter onto solid concrete and made to land on all six sides. They are frozen at -20ºC for up to seven days. They get baked at 50º C for 48 hours. They are shaken on a vibration machine for up to six hours. Then they perform the testing procedures on 24 identical samples and they have to survive all these tests with only minor, cosmetic damage.

    That's just for the standard Pelican case. The Pelican "Storm" cases have to survive all those tests AND they have to survive being submerged in 1 meter of water for a given period of time without any leakage.

    Long story short: Don't screw around. Just get the Pelican.
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

    -----

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  9. #9

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    I have Pelican 1510 which is TSA approved for an overhead compartment. Inside I have either my d***tal gear or my Bronica, Canon A1 with two lenses, a light meter, all my filters for both cameras, and a good amount of film.
    Like Worker said. Don't screw around. Just get the Pelican.

  10. #10
    annunaki's Avatar
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    Big, big fan of the Pelican 1550. I use that with my RB67, 2 lenses, 120 back, Polaroid back, 45mm extension tube, and I still have plenty of room left over for film & accessories. I believe I could probably throw in another lens or two.

    For the "wedding trunk" I use the Pelican 1650. I've spent 22 years in the military as well and swear by these Pelican cases. They can take a serious beating (water is nothing) and still come out unscathed.

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