Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,920   Posts: 1,522,065   Online: 820
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 27
  1. #1
    Markok765's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,270
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    24

    Considering Medium format

    Thinking about dipping into MF. I adore shooting people. have somewhat of a darkroom set up (would just need 6x7 neg carrier and 90mm for the enlarger)

    I've been looking around toronto C-list, and some RB67's with lenses are only around 350.. I know its a heavy camera, but I'm used to shooting the heavier nikons with a 20-35 2.8, so I can't imagine it being terrible... or am I wrong?

    How do you guys feel about MF? what do you like about it? is the 'slowing down' and quality difference justifiable for the weight and different style of shooting, given that I don't enlarger larger than 11x14 most days?
    Marko Kovacevic
    Blog
    Youtube

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    965
    Images
    101
    Quote Originally Posted by Markok765 View Post
    I've been looking around toronto C-list, and some RB67's with lenses are only around 350.. I know its a heavy camera, but I'm used to shooting the heavier nikons with a 20-35 2.8, so I can't imagine it being terrible... or am I wrong?
    I walk around with my RB67 and use it handheld in the street. A couple of things: the lens you use makes a difference. I have a 65mm and a 127mm lens, and the 127mm is easier to handhold (it is actually noticeably lighter and shorter than the 65). A good comfortable strap makes a difference. And after two or three hours you will start to feel it.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    6
    Try MF. A rangefinder or TLR would be a much better walk around MF though. I wanted to get into mf for the image quality and used a mamiya 6 as my main camera from 2007 - 2009. I loved the tonal smoothness of mf images. The quality from the mamiya rangefinder lenses is stunning.

  4. #4
    Slixtiesix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    711
    Images
    21
    Go MF! It´s addictive ;-) I find the waist level finder really handy for shooting people.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    108
    The availability of film types is limited (1 color, 1 b+w) , but a 127 film TLR would be the smallest way to get into MF. Baby Rollei's and Yashica 44's are pretty cheap, and easy to carry, and your negative is twice as large as 35mm. The lenses on both those cameras should be pretty terrific.

    --nosmok

  6. #6
    Mustafa Umut Sarac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    İstanbul - Türkiye
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    3,719
    Images
    108
    Quality and brand of a lens makes too much difference. I believe every brand of camera lenses are different schools and not every lens from same brand is at same high level.
    Mamiya is extremelly contrasty and good for full depth of field. Someone posted at gallery , Ireland pictures and I suggest to look for them and study his lens. It is excellent and gives the all curves, skin details and shadows plus light plays at the face. Its like classic Hasselblad shots. But this was for bw work. One lens in Mamiya family is really awful may be 110 mm , I am not remembering now and You must be careful before walking on this land mine.

    Pentax lenses are too much saturated and gives plastic colors inside shots. But out of depth of field , it gives a noise on the subject like an Leica. If you will shoot from the distance Mamiya is better , if you will shoot crowds from close distance with recording too many out of focus play , Pentax is better.

    For color , Mamiya is more neutral if you like pink skin tones. Hasselblad is sharper and better color curve but I found its black is so strong , some of the daylight shadow pictures tend to dark looking.

    But overall Hasselblad is winner but I dont like their Distagon

  7. #7
    markbarendt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Ignacio, CO, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,589
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    19
    I love the RB. Having fewer shots per roll is great for me, means film doesn't wait in the camera near as much.

    I do some hand holding but more often it's on a monopod or a tripod. The monopod is sweet for walking about.

    I have an older non-C 90mm lens that is "just fine thank you", and a 150SF C that is truly special as far as I'm concerned.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  8. #8
    CGW
    CGW is offline

    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,798
    Put together an RB kit 3 years ago this month. Yup, it's big but too much is made of its size and weight blocking its ability to deliver stunning images. It's a killer portrait camera. Close focuses without pricey macro lenses, extension tubes or diopters. The rotating back allows quick portrait/landscape changes without shifting the camera's significant mass(try that with a Pentax 67 on a less-than-robust tripod/head--scary).

    Watch out on CL stuff, especially if you're unfamiliar with the Mamiya RB 67. Go for a Pro S or Pro SD body+backs. The old RB has no double exp. lock-outs--problematic until you get used to the shutter cock/film advance 2-step. They're also getting very old. These were studio gear that usually did long, heavy duty service. A kit with, say, a Pro S body, WLF, 120 Pro S back, and a 90/3.8C lens is a good start. Backs and RB adapters often need new light seals--a fairly easy DIY fix. I'd almost recommend building a kit from pieces rather than jumping at a kit--while the trade-off is better quality often at a slightly higher price, there's also the old problem of "pay less get less" with used gear.

    I have 645 and 6x6 cameras but take out the big Mamiya most often. It's not a camera for fast moving subjects. The huge, plasma-like viewfinder with its magnifier allows for very precise focus. Remember that you'll need an accurate incident light meter, too, and flash metering capability if you plan on using strobes. The purely mechanical operation forces you to take your time and 10 shots on a 120 roll discourages carelessness.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Northwest Arkansas
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    85
    Do it, do it! Are you stuck on 6x7 for any reason? I take all my best pictures with my Rolleicord V. It's light and VERY portable with the great Schneider Xenar... That and a Gossen Luna-pro is really all I need...

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    MA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    20
    If all you shoot are head and shoulders portraits, I'm not sure you'll notice the difference at 11x14. But if you're shooting full-bodies I would guess that you will notice the difference in detail. Plus, the larger negs are easier to work with. You'll get used to the WLF.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin