Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,564   Posts: 1,573,412   Online: 878
      
Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 44
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Michigan
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    286

    Mamiya RZ67 or Bronica SQ-Ai

    So I have been researching for months for which camera to get. I'm at the point where I feel like I am ready to buy a MF camera finally

    I have boiled my options to a Mamiya RZ67 or a Bronica SQ-Ai. I would like to go 6x6 or 6x7 from what I have been reading online. The camera will be used hand held most of the time. I have read the RZ67 is pretty heavy but I have read a few people say they use theirs hand held all the time. Can someone shed some light on this?

    Also, the Bronica would be paired with a WLF, 80mm 2.8 PS lens, and 120 back. The Mamiya would be outfitted with a 110mm 2.8, WLF, and 120 back.

    Thanks!

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Central Florida, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,029
    They are completely different cameras....

    RZ is a big and heavy behemoth meant to be used in studio or in less mobile usage. Bronica SQ is more of a field assignment camera and it was popular for wedding photography. Not that you can't do either with RZ or SQ but intended market is quite different.

    I have used RZ hand-held for a bit. It's do'able but I wouldn't want to do it for very long. It's not only heavy, it's cumbersome.

    I don't know SQ-Ai but I do have a later model Mamiya M645Pro - which is similar. It's still on heavy side compared to 35mm but not so much as RZ. It's entirely usable as a field camera and hand-held.

    One thing you'd notice with MF camera after a while is that because of the film size, DOF is thinner than 35mm. That would mean if you want a greater DOF, you'd have to use slower shutter speed - which makes hand-holding difficult at times. This is especially if you demand the highest degree of sharpness that MF affords over 35mm.

    Something to consider.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    New York
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    319
    Quote Originally Posted by tkamiya View Post
    They are completely different cameras....

    RZ is a big and heavy behemoth meant to be used in studio or in less mobile usage.

    Something to consider.
    I have an RZ67 and I've carried it for a few hours at a time hiking, plus I hand hold it 80% of the time on shoots. It's not as heavy as people think with a waist level.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Albuquerque, NM
    Posts
    582
    Images
    18
    I shoot a SQa for years. Never used the WL finder much. Always shot it with the AE prism and the Speed Winder for hand held. With that set-up, it was easier to shoot than most 35mm SLRs. You can wrap your hand around the handle very securely. I sold it (along with a 4x5) and compromised on a RZ 67. Definitely heavier, and more cumbersome to shoot handheld, but not impossible. A good OP-Tech weight reducing strap definitely helps.

  5. #5
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    12,807
    Images
    60
    If you feel you need to use a prism finder, the RZ67 is a very large and heavy camera for someone who intends to shoot hand held most of the time.

    Unless of course you are Annie Leibovitz, or at least have a few of her assistants at hand .

    I do carry and use an RB67 hand-held, but only for part of its use.

    When I can, I like to have the RB67 on at least a monopod, and preferably a tripod.

    The closest camera I own to a Bronica SQ-Ai is my Mamiya 645 Pro, and it works very well as a hand-held camera.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  6. #6
    Tony-S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Fort Collins, Colorado, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    721
    Images
    14
    There is also the Bronica GS-1 SLR, which is a 6x7cm camera. It is smaller and lighter than the RB/RZ cameras, but does not have rotating backs or the lens selection (50mm, 65mm, 100mm, 110mm macro, 150mm, 200mm and 250mm lenses are readily available). Backs include 6x7, 6x6, 6x4.5 in both 120 and 220. Reasonably priced, too.

  7. #7
    ContaxRTSFundus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Crickhowell, Wales
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    145
    I often use the RZ67 ProIID hand-held with an AE Finder, Winder II and the 100-200 zoom and it is not too uncomfortable, especially after regularly using a Fuji GX680III with the 50mm lens hand-held. With the RZ, you can get 6x7, 6x6 and 6x4.5 backs as well as a stunning array of lenses and the floating element and APO lenses are among the sharpest made for any camera. The range of accessories for the RZ is exemplary with a variety of viewfinders, grips, shades, remote releases, etc etc.

    There are some compatibility issues between the 3 types of metered Finders for the RZ67 Pro and the later ProII - the only AE Finder approved for use with the R67 ProII is the FE701; according to Mamiya the others won't work with the later versions of the camera (although some of the earlier AE Finders were modified by Mamiya for use with the ProII). If you stick with the RZ67 Pro you will have the best range of finders available (and it's cheaper than the ProII) and there's not much to choose between the Pro and ProII. Of course, if you stick to the Waist-Level Finder, the rig is quite a bit lighter. One other bonus is that the mechanical grips made for the RB67 can be used with the RZ too if you don't need the electronic shutter release on the RZ's Left Hand Grip.

    The RZ is very versatile and offers some of the best glass of any camera system, medium format or otherwise. And it's not that heavy really - perhaps you could try hiring one for a weekend to test it?

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Michigan
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    286
    First off THANK YOU to everyone who replied. Like I said I have been researching this for months but there's nothing like personal experience. I would like to consider myself somewhat lumberjack-manly so I can't imagine a 5lb camera causing TOO many problems. I would most definitely be sticking to the WLF for now.

    Also, this is a Pro model (not a ProII, sorry for not mentioning that). I have looked into the Bronica GS-1 but as ContaxRTSFundus said, I have read phenomenal things about Mamiya lenses. The lens that I would get with this kit is the 110 2.8 which doesn't seem like too big of a lens and the ~50mm equivalent will be a comfortable focal length for me.

    I have heard of the full floating optics but I am having a hard time finding a good article of what exactly they are/how they work. Could anyone shed some light on this?

    Thanks again!

  9. #9
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    12,807
    Images
    60
    Quote Originally Posted by tron_ View Post
    I have heard of the full floating optics but I am having a hard time finding a good article of what exactly they are/how they work. Could anyone shed some light on this?

    Thanks again!
    Traditionally, the individual elements in a single focal length lens remained fixed in respect to each other - the entire lens moved forward and backward in order to achieve focus. This meant that the lens was optimized for one particular distance. Shots taken at other distances were more likely to exhibit aberrations that were corrected for at the optimal distance. In addition, and most commonly, the lens would be more likely to show good flat field performance at one optimum distance, whereas at other distances the field of sharp rendition would be more curved, resulting in either sharp centre and out of focus corners, or sharp corners and out of focus centre (for flat subjects, parallel to the lens plane).

    Floating optics include a mechanism that moves the individual lens elements in relation to each other. This permits optimum or near-optimum performance at a wider variety of subject distances/magnifications.

    Floating element lenses are generally more complex and more expensive to design and manufacture. In some cases they depend on the availability of more exotic glasses and aspherical (as compared to spherical) lens element preparation. They probably wouldn't even exist except for improvements in computer processing as part of the lens design process.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  10. #10
    ChristopherCoy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    The Armpit of Texas
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,298
    Images
    28
    Quote Originally Posted by Tony-S View Post
    There is also the Bronica GS-1 SLR, which is a 6x7cm camera. It is smaller and lighter than the RB/RZ cameras, but does not have rotating backs or the lens selection (50mm, 65mm, 100mm, 110mm macro, 150mm, 200mm and 250mm lenses are readily available). Backs include 6x7, 6x6, 6x4.5 in both 120 and 220. Reasonably priced, too.

    Ok, ok, ok.... whooooaaa truck!


    This GS-1 you say has a 6x6 back??? Because I just looked at a few online and one of these bodies with a 150 f4, back, WLF, and speed winder is at a $300 buy it now price!!!

    If they are that cheap, and just as good as a Hassy, I'd just as soon sell my Hassy and go Bronica. I like my Hassy, but I can't afford to do anything else with it because of the expensive equipment. I'm stuck at 80mm with no possibility of any other focal range any time soon....

Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin