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  1. #21
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    Question: Don't some of these Mamiyas use funky batteries that are hard to come by?

    There's a Mamiya for sale in the consignment case at my local camera store but I have not taken a closer look at it because I hear that the battery might be hard to replace.

    Spending money on a camera that could end up being mothballed for lack of a battery isn't a very palatable proposition to me.

    Is this true or have I been getting a line?
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

    -----

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  2. #22
    zsas's Avatar
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    My Mamiya 1000s uses a PX28.....can find anywhere $7ish:
    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/cont...=REG&A=details

    The light meter prism takes 2 regular 1.5v batteries too...
    Andy

  3. #23

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    I have a friend who shots with a Nikon SLR and a Mamiya 645. He uses the both in the same way - shooting the MF camera just like a 35mm but with significantly higher quality results. I have a Bronica SQA. It isn't that much larger but is at least for me... its slight size increase makes handling different. Or maybe its the exposure count. Either way, I think the Mamiya 645 system is one of the best deals out there right now. Dirt cheap for what you can get.

  4. #24
    MattKing's Avatar
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    The lens is a lot newer than the camera - and therefor preferable.

    It would be a great way to try out 645. If you like it, the lens and inserts (and possibly the grip) will work fine with a newer body.

    You will probably want a shorter lens as well though to get enough of a true experience from the experiment.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  5. #25
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lxdude View Post
    That of course, is the rare ETR/SQ hybrid which took lenses from either and had an expandable film gate.
    Which is what they should have made. An SQ with film backs for 6x4.5 or 6x6 would have been good but they made the ETRS before the SQ.


    Steve.
    Last edited by Steve Smith; 05-15-2012 at 06:01 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  6. #26
    daleeman's Avatar
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    Upon reviewing the package at $200 you are getting a really good deal. I had the 1000s for years and it was by far the best Mamiya I had worked with. The 150 lens is tack sharp, too sharp for a woman's portrait over 45 years old so I had a cheap UV filter I would smear some finger grease on again and again to soften up the image.

    The prisim is nice, but I really liked the waist level finder on mine. the grip is good and the rest of the items are a gift. But if you like turning the camer up for portraits, its almost necessary.

    So buy a great camera. I was very happy with mine until a damn Hasselblad jumped up and bit me in the wallet. Then I switched systems. Ramie Noodles are not that bad 6 times a week I found out while owning and buying more Hasselblad equipment.

    Lee

  7. #27
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brucemuir View Post
    Don't know why 645 gets little love here.
    i actually like it. Still immensely portable but the IQ advantage of 135 is sure evident to me even in 8x10s.
    The tones are just smoother.
    Agree. I have a 645 Pro. It's a significant step up from 35mm and smaller and easier to hand hold than 6x7. I do have a 6x6 Yashicamat and a 6x7 back for my 4x5 so I shoot to some extent with all three. 6x6 was mainly invented for TLRs so you didn't need to turn the camera to shoot verticals. I do find I like the square for some images, but not all by any means, and often enough find myself cropping the 6x6 to 6x4.5 or so anyway. I don't think 6x4.5 to 6x6 is enough of a difference to make much difference and both are actually really big step ups from 35mm. 6x7 is in a different league, but is also in a different league in size and weight.

    The batteries for my Pro are readily available 4SR44s silver oxide or equivalent alkaline or lithium, plus a 2CR5 for the winder, but I understand from one of the posts above that the 1000s is different. My metered prism is also powered from the camera body battery which is also good.

    If the equipment checks out, go for it. If you like it, great, if not it can be sold without much if any loss.

  8. #28
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brucemuir View Post
    Don't know why 645 gets little love here.
    i actually like it. Still immensely portable but the IQ advantage of 135 is sure evident to me even in 8x10s.
    The tones are just smoother.

    1. Not enough improvement over 135
    2. Why waste the ability to get 6x6?
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  9. #29
    cliveh's Avatar
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    The situation with Mamiya today may be different, but about 20 years ago I sometimes visited a very established camera repair guy (lifetime service). I once asked him, what type of cameras do you most have to deal with for repair? His awnswer was Mamiya.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  10. #30
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
    The situation with Mamiya today may be different, but about 20 years ago I sometimes visited a very established camera repair guy (lifetime service). I once asked him, what type of cameras do you most have to deal with for repair? His answer was Mamiya.
    The job security must have been good for him.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

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