Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,821   Posts: 1,581,870   Online: 1114
      
Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 43
  1. #11
    andrew.roos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Durban, South Africa
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    472
    Images
    12
    Quote Originally Posted by Allen Friday View Post
    Back up and use a longer lens on the MF camera. You will need more studio space, but the effect of tilting the camera down will be much less noticeable.
    The only other option is to accept distorted negs and tilt the easel when printing to restore the correct perspective. But then you will have to ensure adequate depth of field when printing.
    "There are no rules for good photographs, there are only good photographs" (Ansel Adams)

  2. #12
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawai'i
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    17,482
    Images
    20
    As Allen suggests, if you're close enough to be getting excessive distortion, then use a longer lens and back up. This is a completely normal photographic situation.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  3. #13
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    12,918
    Images
    60
    Have the subject lean forward slightly, and have the camera slightly lower than eye level and use a longer lens
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  4. #14
    Diapositivo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Rome, Italy
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,844
    Quote Originally Posted by cjbecker View Post
    With the medium format that does not have movements, I put the camera at eye level, and also with the camera level, but then it’s not composed the way that I prefer. The subject is in the bottom of the frame with lots of room above there head. The only way to correct that is but tilting the camera down or lowering the whole camera, but that either makes the proportions wrong, or makes the subject look down at you. Neither that I like.

    Is there any way around the problem of framing without a camera with movements?
    I don't know if I understand your problem exactly.
    When you say "I put the camera at eye level" I suppose you mean subject eye level.
    If this is a "headshot" (primissimo piano, you only frame the head, from neck to top, with little room above head) the eyes should be at half height of the frame, you should have no problem.

    If this is a "bust" portrait (primo piano, from half chest up, leaving more room above the subject) maybe the eyes, depending on how you frame, would fall a bit above the middle of the frame. If you now put the camera at "eye level" you again have more space above the head in the picture, but you shouldn't have putting the camera at eye level as a goal.

    In this situation, I would just leave the eyes in the upper middle of the frame. I would just keep the camera "level" (and the subject "vertical") and frame without regard of the relation between subject eye and lens axis.

    If this results in "too big a nose" then your lens is too wide-angle for portrait and there is nothing one can do for that.

    Generally speaking close portrait lens are, on 35mm, around 85 - 100mm of focal length, i.e. they are slight tele lens ("portrait tele lens" so called not by chance ).

    With medium format you should use a focal length of around 135mm, keep the camera "level", and you should be able to frame your subject for a close headshot without any unnatural distortion and without any need to place the eyes of the subject in line with the axis of the lens, I suppose. You would focus on the eye closer to the camera, but there's no need to keep the eyes at the same height of the lens axis.

    Fabrizio
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  5. #15
    markbarendt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Beaverton, OR, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,796
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by cjbecker View Post
    I don’t want to waste neg, I crop in camera.
    It's not a waste, it's a choice. Movements or cropping?
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  6. #16
    DesertNate's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    New Mexico
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    42
    If your subject looks down at you when you shoot a normally composed photo, you're WAY too close and your lens is too short. Triple your focal length and take 4 steps back.

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    16,878
    Images
    23
    hi clark

    can you point us to a portrait in your portfolio ( here on on your website ) that shows
    the style you are trying to recreated with your mf camera ?
    while i understand what you are trying to do ( rise+tilt )
    the easiest way to do that with a MF camera is to back up and use a longish lens, flatten the perspective &c.
    unless you are able to tilt your enlarger head and baseboard .. then you do one movement when you take the photograph
    and the other, when you make your print ... either that, or get yourself a MF camera that has a flexible body, so you can do all the things with it that you do with your LF camera ...

    good luck !
    john

  8. #18
    cjbecker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    IN
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    772
    Images
    19
    Here is the thing. I prefer to use a lens in the normal range for portraits. This is for the 3/4 to full body. I dont really like how a long lens makes the image unintimant. For head shots I am still using a normal lens. 80 for 6x6 and 150 for 4x5. I love how they show intamicy in the portrait. You feel like you are right there with the subject.


    Then I am also doing envirmental portraits with a wide angle. 50 of 6x6. This is where the problem is most dominent. This was what i was doing last night and got frustrated. It was impossible to compose.
    Last edited by cjbecker; 05-15-2012 at 09:55 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Adirondacks
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,660
    You either have to use a longer lens and stand back, or deal with the situation you now have.

  10. #20
    cjbecker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    IN
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    772
    Images
    19
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	CJB137.jpg 
Views:	35 
Size:	145.7 KB 
ID:	51037

    This is the style with the large format where I place the camera a eye level (or close) and then drop the back to compose.

    I don’t really have any good ones to show of the environmental with the wide angle, it’s not something thats normal for me I just plan on shooting more. I have some undeveloped negs of this circumstance though.

Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin