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  1. #11
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    Cut all the ambient light. Increase the strobe power if possible or bring the lights in closer.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by ic-racer View Post
    Cut all the ambient light. Increase the strobe power if possible or bring the lights in closer.
    Yep.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by ic-racer View Post
    Cut all the ambient light. Increase the strobe power if possible or bring the lights in closer.
    Increasing the strobe power will increase the duration of the strobe. Not what the OP wants.
    Moving the strobes closer and using the same aperture but a lower power setting will result in the same light intensity on the subject and a shorter flash duration.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by E. von Hoegh View Post
    Increasing the strobe power will increase the duration of the strobe. Not what the OP wants.
    Moving the strobes closer and using the same aperture but a lower power setting will result in the same light intensity on the subject and a shorter flash duration.
    My B800 alien bees lamps at full power have a maximum duration of 1/1100th, they typically run at less than half power, so run even shorter, in my setups when I'm trying to lose the ambient light.

    Even at 1/1100th subjects really have to move darn quick to cause a blur.

    Edit - I do believe in getting the lights closer, not just for power but for shaping.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  5. #15
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by E. von Hoegh View Post
    Increasing the strobe power will increase the duration of the strobe. Not what the OP wants.
    Moving the strobes closer and using the same aperture but a lower power setting will result in the same light intensity on the subject and a shorter flash duration.
    It is a woman's arm not a bullet.

  6. #16
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    The sync speed should be irrelevant to stopping motion with strobes. You should be able to stop motion with a sync speed of 1/40 sec. (just imagine what you would get on film at, say, 1/60 sec, f:16, ISO 100 in average indoor lighting--not much of anything), if you set the strobes to a short duration/low power and reduce the ambient light so that it doesn't make a difference, but that doesn't mean it has to be totally dark. If you want more light with a short flash duration, then the way to do it is to use more strobe heads at the same power. The model to follow is more Lois Greenfield than Edgerton:

    http://www.loisgreenfield.com/galler...nce/index.html

    If you look at this video, you can see there's enough light from the modeling lights to shoot video, without it getting too close to the level of the strobes for shooting stills:

    http://vimeo.com/11541771
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by ic-racer View Post
    It is a woman's arm not a bullet.
    Pardon me. The OP didn't state precisely what the model was doing, or what power level/duration she was using.

    The thread title is "Freezing movement" right?

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb View Post
    The sync speed should be irrelevant to stopping motion with strobes. You should be able to stop motion with a sync speed of 1/40 sec. (just imagine what you would get on film at, say, 1/60 sec, f:16, ISO 100 in average indoor lighting--not much of anything), if you set the strobes to a short duration/low power and reduce the ambient light so that it doesn't make a difference, but that doesn't mean it has to be totally dark. If you want more light with a short flash duration, then the way to do it is to use more strobe heads at the same power. The model to follow is more Lois Greenfield than Edgerton:

    http://www.loisgreenfield.com/galler...nce/index.html

    If you look at this video, you can see there's enough light from the modeling lights to shoot video, without it getting too close to the level of the strobes for shooting stills:

    http://vimeo.com/11541771
    Bummer is I only have 2 lights at this stage. Another one could be obtained if I go without food and rent
    However!! This video is amazing! I watched it 4 times and could only discern 2 main lights going, so WHYYYY is her
    model not blurrrriiiing. Is it because they have a Blad with a kickass digital back?? The principles would be the same, right?
    And looking at the size of their studio compared to mine in terms of the distance of light to model, it is relatively about the
    same in my studio except on a much smaller scale. Mine is about a third that size, so if I was to bring the light in closer and
    lower the power, the light would be like sitting on the model's cheek.
    I must go back to the drawing board.
    Thanks for the link - the work she's doing would've been soooooo useful to me about 2 years ago, I was doing a
    very similar action/choreographed motion thing, damnit!

  9. #19
    Holly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by E. von Hoegh View Post
    Pardon me. The OP didn't state precisely what the model was doing, or what power level/duration she was using.

    The thread title is "Freezing movement" right?
    I should clarify: I'm not after frozen bullets through water balloons (although that would be fun) but just
    have a model simply moving from position to position on the spot, and she's mostly motionless as I'm shooting
    but on the occasions when she's still turning around or what have you, there's blur in the hands and arms.
    So it's not as if I'm trying to capture insane micro miliseconds of action but more trying to solve the reason
    why a really slow moving model still has blur.

  10. #20
    MattKing's Avatar
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    I see you are using two strobes.

    Is there any chance they aren't synching together - i.e. there is a slight lag between them?

    Try an experiment with just a single strobe to see if the blur disappears.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

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