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  1. #11
    ChristopherCoy's Avatar
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    I use Kodak Brownie Hawkeyes and I dont have a problem using 120 film with a 620 take up spool. From what I have learned browsing the internet, the older models usually accept 120 better than the later models. Apparently the later models have a tab that prevents 120 reels unless you bend it or cut it off.

    Also, I don't know if its a true 'box' camera or not, but I greatly enjoy the German made Certo Phot. It's a steel body, and has a single speed shutter with bulb mode. I have two of them now and I like them just as much as I do the Hawkeyes. They are 120 ready so no modifications are needed.

  2. #12

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    The Kodak Brownie Cresta range is 120 format, cheap and fun to use. The plastic lens is nothing to write home about but it does have a built in yellow and close-up (5ft) filter.
    6x6 format

    I also have an old Coronet Ambassador which takes 120 as standard - 6x9 with instant/time shutter and oddly a built in green filter

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Shawn Rahman View Post
    I like the last version of the Zeiss Ikon Box Tengor.

    http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archivo...tengor_sst.jpg

    I picked up mine in superb condition on ebay for about $30. Superbly crafted, and much fun to use!
    I'll second the nomination! The Tengor has a reputation as the box camera and is an excellent performer, at least if you add the "...for a box camera" qualifyer. The lens is an AR-coated achromat (cemented doublet), unlike the single meniscus found in most box cameras. This results in surprisingly good optical performance, especially considering that it is 6x9 format (getting reasonable sharpness in the corners can be challenging with lesser lenses). As you can see in the link Shawn provided, the camera has three aperture settings. Although these are all small, they are perfectly appropriate for a box camera, and provide sufficient flexibility for daylight conditions. The three-focus settings work well also. The mechanism is not scale-focus per-se, but rather works by bringing auxillary lenses into place to achieve closer focus. It also has several other features not always found on box cameras - tripod bush, a selector for instantaneous or time modes, and a cable release socket.

    Jeff

  4. #14
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
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    The Tengor is undoubtably the best box camera - but I'm not sure of the attraction of a good box camera. The pictures don't have any of the quirkiness of a Holga or fuzz of a Brownie I'm not sure I see the point. Prices have been driven up as the camera is now collectible.

    There is an old black cardboard-box Brownie #2 that takes 120 film. Even has an aperture adjustment and takes time exposures.
    DARKROOM AUTOMATION
    f-Stop Timers - Enlarging Meters
    http://www.darkroomautomation.com/da-main.htm

  5. #15

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    OK, I'll add a vote to the candidate Box Tengor. The later ones especially are pretty good (well, it's all relative).

    Here's an example out of mine:

    It's Dead Jim

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicholas Lindan View Post
    The Tengor is undoubtably the best box camera - but I'm not sure of the attraction of a good box camera. The pictures don't have any of the quirkiness of a Holga or fuzz of a Brownie I'm not sure I see the point.

    ..SNIP...
    I hear what you're saying, and it is a fair point that the Tengor produces images which are perhaps somewhat "ordinary" compared to the character of images produced by more typical box cameras. Personally, I like different cameras for different reasons, and I find that if an older camera doesn't have some particular quality, some qurkiness, something that makes it stand out - at least on an intellectual level, if not in terms of the images produced or how it is used - then I tend to be less interested. But for me, the fun of the Tengor is precisely that it IS "just" a box camera, and yet can produce high quality images! I really like the idea of showing people pictures that for all practical purposes might have been produced by any modern digital camera, and then revealing that the camera used was actually a 60 year old film camera. ...and "just" a box camera, at that! I am probably a bit strange, but I do get a kick out of that.

    As for the climbing prices in recent years, that is my experience too. It seems to be a general trend for most older cameras, at least the medium format ones that I am interested in anyway.

    Jeff

  7. #17

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    Agfa Clack. Haven't seen any photos from mine yet, got a couple of rolls I need to process, but it looks great!

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