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  1. #11
    andrew.roos's Avatar
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    In 5 years the GF670 will be worth considerably more than any digicam you buy today for the same price. I can't speak for Kodak but pretty sure that at least the small vol film manufacturers like Ilford will still be here.
    Last edited by andrew.roos; 06-13-2012 at 12:30 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    "There are no rules for good photographs, there are only good photographs" (Ansel Adams)

  2. #12

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    I would not have the sales skills to organize this, but it seems like if the last film manufacturer were about to snuff it, someone could take up a subscription among film camera users to recapitalize the company and keep it operating, albeit on a small scale with very few emulsions. In other words, sell stock the old-fashioned way: go round offering it to a specifically selected audience of people with an interest in the industry. There are many people out there who have user (non-museum-piece) camera gear worth thousands or even tens of thousands of dollars/euros/pounds or millions of yen (etc.). If film disappears, that gear instantaneously becomes worthless paper-weights, boat-anchors, and door-stops. Would it not be more economically rational for such a person (and you'd be one, if you had a $2000 GF670) to ante up, say, some hundreds of dollars to help salvage The Last Film Company, than to lose their entire equipment investment for lack of film? We hold the solution to the problem ourselves, if it comes to that.

    Not being stroppy here. Please do poke holes in that plan if merited! (Other than the obvious one, "it'll never come to that!" I already agree.)

    --Dave

  3. #13

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    I think film has a decent future, apparently Kodak does something like $2bn of film a year, and Fujifilm about $450m. Fujifilm say sales of Velvia are going *up*, and Kodak says they have have had a bit of a resurgence too. In the event that film does die off, it won't be overnight, and you'll see it coming years in advance.

    Also, B&W film is a far smaller investment to produce, and Foma and the like could continue longer than the big players. Lots of people only shoot B&W, so there will still be a market to sell your cameras to those people.

    And lets say in 5 years time, you need to sell you camera, it'll still be worth *something* and it's entirely possible your own financial situation will have changed so that the cost to you is less significant.

    I used to worry about this sort of thing too, but it's easier if you accept that nothing lasts forever, and all you can do is enjoy the present. You cannot predict the future, nobody can. Who'd have predicted after LPs were replaced for many people by cassettes, then CDs, then MP3s, they still sell just fine in their own niche?

    It's a big world, if 99.99% if people shoot digital, and only 0.001% shoot film, it's still quite a big market for someone to profit from.

  4. #14

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    Film will always be around.

  5. #15

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    But if you always think about the resale value, you won't enjoy shooting at all.

  6. #16
    Perry Way's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RattyMouse View Post
    I had the GA645 back when it first came out. Wonderful camera. But back then I was infatuated with larger negatives and went with the GSW690. Those were the days.
    In my case the GA645 has come in handy for my hiking/trekking trips and recently (this last weekend) I used it for taking 90% of the wedding I shot as it shines in action scenes where timing is crucial and you only get one chance for the shot and it must count.

    Given the quality of films available, I've found one does not need to bump up to a larger format if you take most if not all of your shots with full-frame (no cropping) considered. Why I say it that way is because I have gotten sharper images from 6x45 using the Fuji GA645 than I got from 6x9 on several other cameras I own. In addition, it's easily less than 1/4 the weight of my Mamiya RB67 Pro S, and no heavier than a light 35mm SLR or DSLR and yet you can easily enlarge to 16x20 without losing image or tonal sharpness. With TMax 100, Delta 100, FP4+ and HP5+ I get nearly grainless enlargements, razor sharp to 16x20. Probably larger is possible but I don't have the means to print larger than 16x20 at the moment....

    I would strongly urge the OP to consider having a go with the GA645 like I did and then after 10 or 20 rolls see how you feel.
    Last edited by Perry Way; 06-13-2012 at 04:04 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: spelling
    I love the wilderness and I love my trail cameras, all Fuji's! :) GA645, GW690 III, and the X100 which I think is the best trail camera ever invented (to date).

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Araakii View Post
    But if you always think about the resale value, you won't enjoy shooting at all.
    So true. The only thing i do not like about the gf670 is no winding lever and tht keeps me in a mamiya 7. But fuji makes a fine product as i have both ab xpan and g617.

    Resale value is debatable. If you want more money you need to sit on things, i prefer to dump stuff cheap to get it out f my bag. Yes i loose money, but if i do not use it, i prefer giving it to a photographer who will a and take my loss.

  8. #18

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    The future is very unpredicable.

    It is wise to enjoy the present.

  9. #19
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    If you need to worry about the future availability of Kodak film and the resale value of the camera don't buy it, because you'll spend too much time worrying about your investment to enjoy it.
    Last edited by benjiboy; 06-17-2012 at 08:55 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Ben

  10. #20
    baachitraka's Avatar
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    Prepare yourself what you want to shoot in four seasons in a year within your country. Next travel to your neighbouring countries, explore and take photographs. In few years will have a prints that are worthy than any other considerations you have here.

    Good luck.
    OM-1n: Do I need to own a Leica?
    Rolleicord Va: Humble.
    Holga 120GFN: Amazingly simple yet it produces outstanding negatives to print.

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