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  1. #1
    LJH
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    First Red Window camera - can I shoot colour? ( Specifically, aZeiss Ikon Ercona)

    Probably one of the most basic questions I've asked on any forum, so please go easy!

    I have just purchased a Zeiss Ikon Ercona I. It differs from my other 120 film cameras (6x17cm panoramic) in that it has a the old red window.

    So, here's the easy question:

    Can I run 120 colour film through this?

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Yes.

  3. #3
    LJH
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    Such a sesquipedalian response!! (Seriously, though, many thanks, Ian).

  4. #4
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    If the red light coming through the window could ruin colour film, it would also ruin modern black and white film which is also sensitive to red.

    The backing paper on the film is what blocks the light.

    It is good advice to not allow direct bright sunlight to enter the window but quite often I have to hold my cameras in bright light just to see the numbers on the paper (especially with Ilford film) and I have not had any problems.


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  5. #5
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    There's usuall a light seal betwen the camera's back and the film pressure plate around the red window area, if that's OK there should ne no problems.

    My 6x17 camera has a plain window, no red filter, and I've never had a problem even when I've forgotten to close it, and that was in the constant sunlight on the Aegean coast.

    Steve makes a good point, it's almost impossible to see the nunbering on Ilford 120 films through the red filter on my Zeiss Ikonta.

    Ian

  6. #6
    LJH
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    My 6x17 camera has a plain window, no red filter, and I've never had a problem even when I've forgotten to close it, and that was in the constant sunlight on the Aegean coast.

    Ian
    That was what I was basing my thoughts around. Both of my 6x17s don't have the window, and I, too, have had no issue (even in midday summer sun in outback Australia).

    This question shows me just how good film photography is. I'm happy shooting a ULF sheet film camera, but such a basic question stumps me based on a 60 year old roll film camera. Viva l'analogue!!

    Thanks again for the advice.

  7. #7
    coigach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    Steve makes a good point, it's almost impossible to see the nunbering on Ilford 120 films through the red filter on my Zeiss Ikonta.
    Ian
    Totally agree - it's a real b*gger on my Fotoman 6x17 in low light. Ilford films seem much more difficult to read than other films I've used unfortunately.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    If the red light coming through the window could ruin colour film, it would also ruin modern black and white film which is also sensitive to red.

    The backing paper on the film is what blocks the light.

    It is good advice to not allow direct bright sunlight to enter the window but quite often I have to hold my cameras in bright light just to see the numbers on the paper (especially with Ilford film) and I have not had any problems.
    To expand on this good advise... stick with slow film. In my experience: At 200 ASA light leak is possible and at 400 it is probable.

  9. #9
    Pioneer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post
    To expand on this good advise... stick with slow film. In my experience: At 200 ASA light leak is possible and at 400 it is probable.
    Interesting. I suspect that depends on the condition of the camera. I have successfully used Kodak Portra 800, Fuji Pro 400H and Kodak Tri-X in my Zeiss Ikon Ercona 1, and some of my other folders as well, with no evidence of light leaks.

  10. #10

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    if u are are all worried, a piece of black electrical tape used as a temporary seal will give you reassurance ...

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