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  1. #11
    munz6869's Avatar
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    Gary, the Wista is great, but this trip I only exposed 98 sheets, which in turn is only 49 pictures (two sheets per pic), compared to 100x 120 rolls (9 frames each). I don't really see a field camera as a good travel camera (a press camera, or field with a rangefinder would be better (and I am trying to 'make one :-)) This does not stop me taking it anyway - and the tripod has proven very very useful in hotel rooms for tying the other end of a clothes line to...

    Marc!
    Marc Morel
    photographie argentique!
    ------------
    http://mrmarcmorel.wordpress.com/

  2. #12
    Two23's Avatar
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    Lower budget, the Rolleiflex MX-EVS f3.5. I have one and love it. Definitely gets noticed. Higher budget, the Plaubel Makina.


    Kent in SD

  3. #13
    Leighgion's Avatar
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    For medium format, I've tried traveling with an Agfa Clack, folding Baldalux 6x9 w/105mm f4.5 Schneider-Kreuznach and a Fuji GA645 with the basic 60mm f4 Fujinon.

    The Agfa is light, if blocky and somewhat awkward in the hands. Supremely simple with its fixed aperture, fixed focus lens, but the fixed system renders it very inflexible. Really only good for broad daylight when you have plenty of leisure time. Lens performs much better than you might think though.


    Local Citr÷en by Leighgion, on Flickr

    My Baldalux is the most compact 6x9 I've ever seen, but is a bit weighty due to metal construction. Easy to carry in a bag, but very slow to get into action being manual everything and scale focus.


    Behind Private Lines by Leighgion, on Flickr

    Fuji GA645 is a plastic fantastic lump with no sex appeal (my sister calls it the "anti-chick magnet"), but it's by far the most practical traveling MF rig I've ever had. The plastic means lightweight, and the motorized telescoping lens keeps the body flat and easy to bag when retracted. Access to full automation really speeds shooting on the go up, but the camera retains full manual options. Camera will also imprint your shooting data between the frames! The lens is sharp as sharp can be. Only practical downsides for me is that the metering its through the viewfinder, so it'll shoot cheerfully all day with the lens cap on and the sound of the motor is.. well, very motory.


    Class of '79 (GA645) - 01 by Leighgion, on Flickr

  4. #14

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    For a long time my travel combination was a Fuji GS645S combined with a 35mm compact with fast film in it for low-light or pocket use. These days I tend to take two cameras on trips:

    i) a compact -- either a 35mm (usually a Rollei AFM35) or digital
    ii) a medium format camera -- usually my Rolleiflex, but sometimes a Super Ikonta (6x4.5)

    The last two or three trips I've done with just a 35mm camera (Leica or Hexar) but I've not been completely happy not having a medium format option so I probably won't do that again. If I had to just take one film camera, I'd take the Rolleiflex, as a couple of years of playing with travel camera combinations have convinced me that I get by far the best results from the Rollei. I have a Maxwell screen in mine which helps with focusing in low light; although is actually a bit slower in bright light as it has less focus 'snap'.

    The Rolleiflex is surprisingly compact. I can carry it plus film and accessories in the same size bag I'd use for any interchangeable lens 35mm camera [Leica, slr, etc]. The Super Ikonta takes nice pictures but it's not as quick in use as the Rolleiflex, and mine has an uncoated lens so the look of the images -- while very attractive for some shots -- isn't quite as all-round useful as the Rollei.

    Matt

  5. #15

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    Goose Nest (near Martinsburg), West Virginia
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    I've been very happy with my Bronica RF645, so much so that I just bought another one for backup, as well as for having two types of film available w/o changing film. Now have the 45mm, 65mm, and 100mm lenses (as well as the polarizer and the flash), but just the 65mm was very suitable. It's got a fabulously sharp image. Can be fully manual, although I prefer aperture-priority; the meter is quite accurate. Very ergonomic and solidly built. "Interesting" enough to get some casual questions, but not so interesting as to be distracting. (This has actually been a real problem with shooting out in public with a Hasselblad.)

    --John

  6. #16
    coigach's Avatar
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    Sounds to me like you've got enough cameras

    A Mamiya 7II is a good 'un, the 80mm wide standard is a great lens. (Here's an example of a picture taken with it http://www.apug.org/gallery1/showima...mageuser=12991)

    The camera centre-weighted meter is often way off centre however which can make it a fiddle to use. Mine is, and I often use a handheld meter. (To check positioning of 'centre-weighted' meter, measure against a single light in a darkened room!)
    Last edited by coigach; 07-25-2012 at 05:50 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #17
    Mark Fisher's Avatar
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    You already have the two best in my opinion: the Rollei and the Fuji Ga645Zi. My primary camera is the Hasselblad and it isn't a great travel camera compared to these two. I wouldn't consider it unless it was a dedicated phototrip. Aethestically, the Fuji is horrible...loud and ugly....the opposite of the Rollei. The Fuji is my go to travel camera, though, because it takes images as good as or better than my Hasselblad even with the short zoom. It is also very fast to operate meaning that I catch shots that I might not otherwise. 16 shots per roll with easy loading is a help too. I have a Rollei 3.5 that I am actually thinking of selling because I use the Fuji so much.
    Your first 10,000 pictures are the worst - HCB

    www.markjamesfisher.com

  8. #18

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    Mamiya 7 is highly functional and a great camera, not as pretty as the Fujifilm GF670 though, IMHO. If you like conversation with strangers, the GF670 is quite a looker.

  9. #19

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    I would consider the Fuji GW690 of GSW690.
    I own the type 1 version.
    Build like a tank and superb sharp images as the gx680 which I also own.
    and not to big for a 6x9 camera.

  10. #20
    PDH
    PDH is offline

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    Mamyia 6, not the new version, the folder from the 50s. Very compact, has a good lens, takes SVI hood and filters.

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