Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 75,736   Posts: 1,670,369   Online: 916
      
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 22 of 22
  1. #21

    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,696
    Images
    15
    Quote Originally Posted by CGW View Post
    Whatever. There's no denying the P67 is a plus-size camera that requires a big-a$$ tripod, head, and not a little planning before flipping that considerable mass into portrait/vertical orientation. The lack of mid-roll film change and the need for a hefty tripod kept me from buying one after baby-sitting one for a year. Optics are first-rate--no fight there. I just find my Mamiya RB 67 Pro S easier to handle in and out of studio settings: close-focus without tubes or extra lenses; swappable film backs; and the rotating feature let me use a tripod that's stable but light enough to make a truly portable 6x7 kit.

    That's another odd thing about the 67: people mentioning you need a darned heavy tripod, an industrial strength head and a team of Sherpas to keel haul the caboodle from one place to another. Very Ken Rockwell-ish. I don't have a mega-a$$ tripod head for the 67; it's a bog standard Manfrotto 498RC2.

    Ergonomics means many things to many people. I don't need a kumbuya-holding hands dissertation on the semantics of "ergonomics". For what it's worth, I did not choose the 67 on quality or otherwise of handling, but on the quality and availability of lenses, including two minty optics that were going with the body I was eyeing off.

    What's this stuff about the 67/6x7 as a studio camera? Is somebody going to tell me an EOS 1N is a studio camera? Either camera can be anything at any time, including a great bushwalking companion (and by dint of the effort, a sure-fire conversation starter!). But I'm not taking the 67 bushwalking and will lose nothing because of that.

    I'm reminded of my long-time conservation framer using his 6x7 in his full-tilt studio for 20+ years, only getting rid of it when his eyes (macular degeneration) did not allow him to focus accurately. His studio (closed in 1995, remodelled with no darkroom, as his gallery/reading/open space), in the country, was almost always portraiture, still life/found object studies (using B&W and producing very large prints in his darkroom for framing and sale) and the defining quality of his images was the early Takumar lenses: old 100, 200mm Takumars shot at mid-range Avs; none of the newer SMC Pentax 67 optics from 1989 onward (much of his imaging was on TMax and a very fine and precise Kodak BW emulsion that I forget the name of...TechPan??) One could walk into his studio (above his garage) and be chastised to "watch where you step": sync cords, batteries, three or four strobes, blinds, bulb releases, awnings, extension cords... created a virtual bird's nest, with the "bird" proper being the unmissable 6x7 (with waist-level finder), repleat with those ornate wooden handles, sitting diddly-squat on a massive wooden tripod (the tripod itself — like a surveyor's tripod — weighed about 15kg). It all got turfed out years ago when he walked away from it — sad, bitter and spent. In the small town of Maldon, central Victoria, the battered 6x7 and four lenses went for the princely sum of $800 (around 1996 I think).

    AND, For all the bushwalks we did, I never once saw my friend carry his 6x7, only his much-loved Minolta SRT101 (black) — which he shot Trooping the Colour (on Kodachrome) in the 70s on his honeymoon. His wife still has that camera.

  2. #22

    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    191
    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    AND, For all the bushwalks we did, I never once saw my friend carry his 6x7, only his much-loved Minolta SRT101 (black) — which he shot Trooping the Colour (on Kodachrome) in the 70s on his honeymoon. His wife still has that camera.
    I hiked and did bushwalking with P6X7 and now with P67II and Nikon DSLR. Tripod is manfrotto 021 + 486RC

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin