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  1. #41
    Richard Sintchak (rich815)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fastw View Post
    Thanks for the samples. Been seriously looking at the 6x7 Mamiyas. They look great and aren't very expensive. Found one with the 140mm Macro, but without the eye level prism. Would like one, do you use one? What about the weight, good to walk around with?
    One thing that puzzled me a bit were the data for different Mamiya lenses I came across. It looks like some of the other lenses focus closer and give greater magnification.
    http://www.mamiya.com.tw/RZ67Pro-IID...%20English.pdf

    Cheers, Wojtek
    They are gorgeous cameras. But I HIGHLY recommend you see and hold one before you buy. They are HUGE.
    -----------------------

    "Well, my photos are actually much better than they look..."

    Richard S.
    Albany, CA (San Francisco bay area)

    My Flickr River of photographs
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  2. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by rich815 View Post
    They are gorgeous cameras. But I HIGHLY recommend you see and hold one before you buy. They are HUGE.
    That's good advice.

    I have owned several medium format cameras (Mamiya, Bronica, Pentax, and Hasselblad) and the Mamiya RZ was by far the best portrait camera. With the flash grip it makes it much more manageable hand held.

    It's still a beast and if you want to backpack with a camera outfit I would look elsewhere than the RZ or RB although there are some people who do.

  3. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by rich815 View Post
    They are gorgeous cameras. But I HIGHLY recommend you see and hold one before you buy. They are HUGE.
    I haven't held one for about 20 years. I'll have to try one before I buy definitely.

  4. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by fastw View Post
    I haven't held one for about 20 years. I'll have to try one before I buy definitely.
    I bought my RZ off of Ebay and it came with both waist level finder and metered prism finder. I loved the waist level finder but hated the prism finder. I have a bad back, it's actually fused together. The prism finder adds a lot of weight to the camera which the RZ doesn't need. To be honest with you, I prefer waist level finders anyway.

    Just my opinion. If you can get a chance to handle an RZ with both finders you can decide for yourself.

  5. #45
    NJS
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    Someone already mentioned Rollei SL66. Can be found relatively cheap, lenses can be also used mounted reversely but bellows can already give you tight framing and tilting options can be very useful if you'd want to avoid fuzzy noses. Lenses are superb and if you know how you can squeeze 13 frames per roll.

  6. #46

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    Just looked at a nice Pentax 67 with a Macro. Very nice. Have to sleep on it.

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by fastw View Post
    Just looked at a nice Pentax 67 with a Macro. Very nice. Have to sleep on it.
    Back in the old days India was a place where having the smallest camera and the quitest shutter was a definite plus... at least for candid portraits.
    Now it's less likely to see a whole crowd jumping in between the camera and your subject
    If you don't try to "steal" street portraits, but you approach your subject before firing the shutter, any medium format camera with a longish lens would do the job.
    Some cameras need more application, some can even limit your choices, that's all... nothing that can't be overcome in a way or the other.
    I can testify that: probably my best pictures were done in Afghanistan (some even done while on horsemount!) with an humble Seagull 6x6 with no meter an a fixed 75mm focal. It was a cheap chinese copy of a Rolleicord, really a piece of crap, compared to the MF cameras i i purchased afterwards.
    Nevertheless, what i consider my best all-time portrait (two falconeers with their birds of prey) was taken with the Seagull TLR.

    Having said all that, a good camera helps a lot
    If you decided for the Pentax 6x7, i second your choice.
    After the Seagull, i owned a Yashica 124-G, a Bronica SQa, an Hasselblad 500 C/M, and still own a Rolleiflex, a Mamiya Super 23, and of course a Pentax 67. The latter is by far the best, if you don't do studio work with flashes.
    If you do, there were two leaf-shutter optics made exactly for that... but i'd buy a Mamiya RB or RZ for studio use.
    Where the Pentax 67 shines is for mixed use: part handheld and part on tripod, in-studio or outside.
    With the wooden handle, and with the bottom of the camera resting on your palm, the camera is not so vibration-prone as some people think.

    BTW, the Macro 140mm is both cheap and good, i think you won't regret buying one.
    Despite some mixed reviews, i enjoyed a lot the 120mm Soft. I had it on loan for some time, and i liked very much the portraits i have done with it!

    cheers

    CJ

    Sent from my Android tablet
    Getting back from digital to LF (mostly 5x7" and 8x10")
    selling Linhof Technika III 4x5" (fifth version, graflock back), Mamiya Press outfit + lenses, plus many LF lenses
    trading for soft focus lenses with 8x10" coverage - EU users preferred
    Photographica Flickr sets
    For sale

  8. #48
    xya
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    Quote Originally Posted by canuhead View Post
    Mamiya C330 will get you extremely close. Just make sure to use a Paramender to account for parallax. Regret selling mine....
    yes a wonderful, cheap and easy one. once you've got used to the parallax indicator on the matte screen, you even don't need the paramender for portraits.

  9. #49

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    Quote Originally Posted by cyberjunkie View Post
    Back in the old days India was a place where having the smallest camera and the quitest shutter was a definite plus... at least for candid portraits.
    Now it's less likely to see a whole crowd jumping in between the camera and your subject
    If you don't try to "steal" street portraits, but you approach your subject before firing the shutter, any medium format camera with a longish lens would do the job.
    Some cameras need more application, some can even limit your choices, that's all... nothing that can't be overcome in a way or the other.
    I can testify that: probably my best pictures were done in Afghanistan (some even done while on horsemount!) with an humble Seagull 6x6 with no meter an a fixed 75mm focal. It was a cheap chinese copy of a Rolleicord, really a piece of crap, compared to the MF cameras i i purchased afterwards.
    Nevertheless, what i consider my best all-time portrait (two falconeers with their birds of prey) was taken with the Seagull TLR.

    Having said all that, a good camera helps a lot
    If you decided for the Pentax 6x7, i second your choice.
    After the Seagull, i owned a Yashica 124-G, a Bronica SQa, an Hasselblad 500 C/M, and still own a Rolleiflex, a Mamiya Super 23, and of course a Pentax 67. The latter is by far the best, if you don't do studio work with flashes.
    If you do, there were two leaf-shutter optics made exactly for that... but i'd buy a Mamiya RB or RZ for studio use.
    Where the Pentax 67 shines is for mixed use: part handheld and part on tripod, in-studio or outside.
    With the wooden handle, and with the bottom of the camera resting on your palm, the camera is not so vibration-prone as some people think.

    BTW, the Macro 140mm is both cheap and good, i think you won't regret buying one.
    Despite some mixed reviews, i enjoyed a lot the 120mm Soft. I had it on loan for some time, and i liked very much the portraits i have done with it!

    cheers

    CJ

    Sent from my Android tablet
    The wooden handle, it seems to me like it should be on the other side. How do you use it? I normally focus with right and shoot with right hand.

  10. #50

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    Just realized how close you can shoot with a Mamiya C330. Anyone with any experience with those?



 

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