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  1. #61
    segedi's Avatar
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    Good luck!
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    Segedi.com

  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by fastw View Post
    The wooden handle, it seems to me like it should be on the other side. How do you use it? I normally focus with right and shoot with right hand.
    You're right about the handle, most cameras have it the other way round.
    Though i still prefer to keep the handle mounted, as i find that it's more useful to help you handle the camera while you walk, than as a support for extra stability when you shoot.
    My right hand is a lot stronger thanthe left, so i find it natural to hold the camera when i want to be ready to shoot a picture.
    When the camera is transported, and there is no need to be ready for a shot, i use the original strap, and i must say that i am in love with the three-point attachment, like that of the LX.
    In the end, the P67 is the only 6x7 really usable handheld (and one of the very few MF's, excluding 4.5x6 cameras).
    Having said all that, frankly i see no reasons to choose an analog MF camera to shoot MOSTLY handheld.
    Occasionally, yes. Most of the times,no.
    The quality of modern MF films screams for a good tripod!
    Especially 6x7 and 6x9 formats have enough film area to allow for nice analog prints up to generous enlargements. Even digitized, they hold up well, using consumer-grade flatbed scanners like an Epson 4990 or V500.
    IMHO, 6x6 is somewhat impaired by the fact that it's cropped to 4.5x6 most of the times (if you don't absolutely love to print square... which of course i don't).
    BTW, the wooden handle doesn't impair the use of the camera on tripod, so you can leave it on all the time, as i do since the first day i purchased it.

    have fun

    CJ

    Sent from my Android tablet
    Getting back from digital to LF (mostly 5x7" and 8x10")
    selling Linhof Technika III 4x5" (fifth version, graflock back), Mamiya Press outfit + lenses, plus many LF lenses
    trading for soft focus lenses with 8x10" coverage - EU users preferred
    Photographica Flickr sets
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  3. #63

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    I actually meant I focus with my left hand and shoot with right. The handle looks absolutely beautiful. Love the wooden bit.
    Would really love a right side one with a release.

  4. #64

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    Quote Originally Posted by cyberjunkie View Post
    In the end, the P67 is the only 6x7 really usable handheld (and one of the very few MF's, excluding 4.5x6 cameras).
    Having said all that, frankly i see no reasons to choose an analog MF camera to shoot MOSTLY handheld.
    Occasionally, yes. Most of the times,no.
    I beg to differ.
    I use my rz67 about 70% of the time handheld. With the grip, it really helps handling the camera. With the 110mm I can shoot handheld at 1/60th, 65mm at 1/30th and have sharp results. Without the grip I wouldn't carry it that long, that's a fact. I guess it all depends on how and what you shoot...

  5. #65
    cyberjunkie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fastw View Post
    I actually meant I focus with my left hand and shoot with right. The handle looks absolutely beautiful. Love the wooden bit.
    Would really love a right side one with a release.
    Sorry if my answer was a little obscure.
    When i wrote that other cameras are made the opposite way, i was thinking about all those big cameras using 120 film, which have handle and release button in the same place. Specifically: Mamiya Press, Graflex XL, and all the small Linhofs.
    While those cameras are not exactly the speediest ones for handheld shooting, all allow to adjust focus and then shoot, without repositioning your right hand.
    In the end, the difference is made by how you use your camera. I never used my 6x7 for fast shooting, and while i loved to use it handheld, i always tried to brace to a tree, pole, or something like that, to decrease the chance of micro-blur.
    I have always feared the vibrations induced by the curtain shutter, but now i can say that's not as bad as it sounds.

    Now i am more a large format lens collector (from mid '800 to the sixties), and i definitely shoot less pictures than i used to do. Pentax digital for travel pics, and large format for more serious stuff. If i am lazy, i use XP2, in 120 rolls, cause it can be developed for a cheap price, like a standard colour negative.
    I mostly shoot 6x9 and 6x12, using a folding press/technical camera.
    Nevertheless, i have kept my P67, while all the other MF cameras have gone (or will go in the near future).
    One of the reasons (which is often overlooked) is that the focal plane shutter allows to experiment with "foreign" optics, either using the bellows or adapting a P67 bajonet to a lens made for another camera.
    I have a Pentacon Six bellows and a Meyer/Pentacon 500mm adapted for the Pentax. I had a Zodiak fisheye (too tough to be adapted), and still have a CZJ Sonnar 300mm (so simple to adapt, that i never had the job done!).

    have fun

    CJ


    Sent from my Android tablet
    Getting back from digital to LF (mostly 5x7" and 8x10")
    selling Linhof Technika III 4x5" (fifth version, graflock back), Mamiya Press outfit + lenses, plus many LF lenses
    trading for soft focus lenses with 8x10" coverage - EU users preferred
    Photographica Flickr sets
    For sale

  6. #66
    cyberjunkie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by raccou View Post
    I beg to differ.
    I use my rz67 about 70% of the time handheld.
    .......
    I guess it all depends on how and what you shoot...
    I can't agree more.
    It all depend on your shooting habits.
    As far as i understand, it should be much better to choose the camera that suits your style, instead of trying to adapt yourself to the peculiarities of the camera.
    Of course, your wallet must allow it in the first place
    If you are not given that choice, trying to adapt yourself to a new camera can be a challenge that opens new doors, not necessary bad...
    Most of the times the nature of the instrument affects the quality of the result. Shooting a couple pictures a day in 8x10" yelds a different kind of pictures than, for example, spraying countless shots in digital.

    BTW, i love the Mamiya RB, but i never had the chance to play a little with one fitted with the handle.
    I am happy that you find it perfectly OK for handheld photography, though it's evident that the RB/RZ were conceived as mainly studio/tripod cameras. The rotating back is the main clue.

    have fun

    CJ

    Sent from my Android tablet
    Getting back from digital to LF (mostly 5x7" and 8x10")
    selling Linhof Technika III 4x5" (fifth version, graflock back), Mamiya Press outfit + lenses, plus many LF lenses
    trading for soft focus lenses with 8x10" coverage - EU users preferred
    Photographica Flickr sets
    For sale

  7. #67
    Diapositivo's Avatar
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    Totally agree with DesertNate in post #36.

    Cameras don't matter much. Choice of focal length comes first, good results depend from laws of perspective.

    In 135 terms the canonical portrait lens would be around 90mm or 100mm. Less than that and the facial traits are distorted as well explained above or, as it also happens, the head appears to be larger than normal in respect of the rest of the body. More than that and the typical "compression" of planes of the tele lens begins being disturbing and detracts from the final result.

    For medium format the focal length must be the larger equivalent, around 160 - 180 mm.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  8. #68
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Diapositivo View Post
    Totally agree with DesertNate in post #36.

    Cameras don't matter much. Choice of focal length comes first, good results depend from laws of perspective.

    In 135 terms the canonical portrait lens would be around 90mm or 100mm. Less than that and the facial traits are distorted as well explained above or, as it also happens, the head appears to be larger than normal in respect of the rest of the body. More than that and the typical "compression" of planes of the tele lens begins being disturbing and detracts from the final result.

    For medium format the focal length must be the larger equivalent, around 160 - 180 mm.
    Basically as Diapositivo stated the choice of focal length for a format size dictates the perspective. Too short a focal length makes the nose large and the ears stick out; too long a focal length foreshortens the head and the face looks flattened.

    I disagree with
    For medium format the focal length must be the larger equivalent, around 160 - 180 mm.
    because medium format can range from 645 to 6x6 to 6x7 to 6x9. For 645 to 6x6 150mm to 180mm would work, however 150mm many be too short for 6x9.

    Soft focus lenses or diffusion filters tend to work better for female portraits, since the distaff usually does not like to have every bit of detail show up in print. If you want to drive a woman crazy just give her a really strong magnifying mirror to use for putting on makeup. Green filters and sometimes orange filters can help remove blemishes.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  9. #69
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rich815 View Post
    They [6x7 Mamiyas] are gorgeous cameras. But I HIGHLY recommend you see and hold one before you buy. They are HUGE.
    And heavy!
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  10. #70

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    Quote Originally Posted by raccou View Post
    I beg to differ.
    I use my rz67 about 70% of the time handheld. With the grip, it really helps handling the camera. With the 110mm I can shoot handheld at 1/60th, 65mm at 1/30th and have sharp results. Without the grip I wouldn't carry it that long, that's a fact. I guess it all depends on how and what you shoot...
    The OP has his camera already, but I'd use a 645 SLR if I wanted to shoot handheld. The Bronica ETRSi is nice, and leaf shutters are quiet. I'm not enough of a masochist to lug about an RZ all day for handheld shooting.



 

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