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  1. #11
    jcoldslabs's Avatar
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    I don't know of any professional (well-known) portrait photographer using a Mamiya 7.
    Mary Ellen Mark uses one currently. At least I saw a video of her in recent months doing a shoot of circus people with a Mamiya 7. FYI.

    Jonathan

  2. #12
    Klainmeister's Avatar
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    Sorry, I'd still take the M7II over a P67 anyday of the week. Better lenses, weighs about 1/2 if not less, super easy to operate. I guess I also am a sucker for RFs anyhow.
    K.S. Klain

  3. #13
    ROL
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    Quote Originally Posted by olwick View Post
    Hi,

    I realize that the Mamiya 7 is primarily a landscape camera, but how does it do with portaits in a pinch? I know the lenses are slower than most, but does anyone have examples of portraits shot wide open with it? Mainly the 80mm lens, but open to others too.

    Thanks,

    Mark
    I don't believe your contention is correct. The M7's were designed primarily as commercial/portrait/wedding cameras, although many, including me, use them liberally for landscape and other subjects. The camera can't give you a tight headshot, but has been used effectively to create stunning documentary portraiture. I believe David Kennerly used them in the Ford Whitehouse.

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