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  1. #41
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Does anyone know whether there actually is an ISO standard for light sensitivity for digital sensors?

    As the film ISO sensitivity standard includes a component respecting contrast (if I understand correctly), it would be very interesting to now what components are referenced in the digital version.

    Should we ask Stephen Benskin ?
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post
    Very interesting. Since I'm not a digital photographer I never knew this. I assumed that the digicam designers would have worked that out so they would be "equivelent". How are DSLR and film ISO (mathematically) related? That would be very important knowlege for all who use a DSLR for metering and proofing, I would think.
    I don't own a DSLR, and I should think we are getting into DPUG territory here, all I can tell you was the tests in Pro Photography Magazine used a Minolta Auto meter V of known accuracy and compared the readings of several DSLRs at 100 I.S.O and got different readings from each camera, and from the meter.
    Ben

  3. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    Does anyone know whether there actually is an ISO standard for light sensitivity for digital sensors?
    I'm sure Ben is right about treading in dangerous "D" waters, but since this is really a question about film metering I hope the "powers-that-be" are lenient.

    I think this might be it and I probably can get a copy on Monday:

    ISO 12232:2006
    Photography -- D****** still cameras -- Determination of exposure index, ISO speed ratings, standard output sensitivity, and recommended exposure index

    Abstract

    ISO 12232:2006 specifies the method for assigning and reporting ISO speed ratings, ISO speed latitude ratings, standard output sensitivity values, and recommended exposure index values, for digital still cameras. ISO 12232:2006 is applicable to both monochrome and colour d****** still cameras.

  4. #44

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    Spend a bit more and get the meter that you want. But it, and buy it once.

    In the long run, it will save you money.

    That's true of most things in life.

  5. #45
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Thanks Brian - now I wonder how the two ISO standards compare .

    Off to see if I can figure it out.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  6. #46
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    If you buy the Sekonic L-758 you can profile the exposure reading to several DSLR camera sensors or films with your computer, but the test target costs in the U.K over £100 (about $153 U.S.) which needs to be added onto the considerable cost of the meter http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_7SZ58CugpY .
    Ben

  7. #47
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    This is the latest Sekonic touch screen light meter http://www.sekonic.com/l-478/photogr...campaign=L-478 , if it made breakfast you could marry it.
    Ben

  8. #48
    Andre Noble's Avatar
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    Go with the Sekonic - It's Better Built

    I have (had) two Sekonics and the Gossen Digi Pro F.

    The Gossen is small, lightweight, and works well. But its quality truly feels like something you could buy in the 99 cent stores. I was really surprised. It is WAy over priced for the build quality.

    But I do use the Gossen a lot because it does truly fit in pocket.
    Andre Noble, Beverly Hills California http://andrenoble.com/

  9. #49
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andre Noble View Post
    I have (had) two Sekonics and the Gossen Digi Pro F.

    The Gossen is small, lightweight, and works well. But its quality truly feels like something you could buy in the 99 cent stores. I was really surprised. It is WAy over priced for the build quality.

    But I do use the Gossen a lot because it does truly fit in pocket.
    Andre:

    Do you mean the "Digipro F" or are you actually referring to the "Digiflash"?

    Your reference to "it does truly fit in pocket" makes me wonder.

    And if, indeed, you mean the "Digiflash", I'm not sure I agree with you about the build quality.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  10. #50
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andre Noble View Post
    I have (had) two Sekonics and the Gossen Digi Pro F.

    The Gossen is small, lightweight, and works well. But its quality truly feels like something you could buy in the 99 cent stores. I was really surprised. It is WAy over priced for the build quality.

    But I do use the Gossen a lot because it does truly fit in pocket.
    I have a Sekonic L-358, a Kenko KFM 2100 (Minolta Autometer V1) and a Gossen Digi Pro F and like you Andre I tend to use the Digi Pro the most because of it's pocketability speed and ease of use, deadly accuracy, and because the other two are much too large to fit my pockets, but I can't agree with your remark about the build quality of the Digi Pro F, I find mine a lot tougher than it looks, and in the almost three years I've had it it's been subject to many abuses, is still unmarked and as accurate as ever, so don't let appearances fool you I don't thing Gossen have ever made a light meter that wasn't rugged,workmanlike, and reliable.
    Last edited by benjiboy; 09-18-2012 at 10:34 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Ben

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