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  1. #1

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    120 film in 220 back

    Havent tried this yet but can u put 120 film in a Mamiya 220 film back?

  2. #2
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    I've used 120 film in a Mamiya 645 220 film insert with no problems, the issue can be that the pressure plate doesn't hold the film flat as there's a difference in the thickness of 220 film compared to 120 film plus its backing paper. Might differ between models/types of back though.

    Ian

  3. #3
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    One thing to know is that since 220 has no paper backing (except for the start and finish of the roll), the pressure plate of the 220 back will have the 120 film a little forward of the optimal plane due to the 120 paper backing.

    Spacing might be a little off since the 120 rolls thicken quicker than 220 film due to the paper backing, also.
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn View Post
    One thing to know is that since 220 has no paper backing (except for the start and finish of the roll), the pressure plate of the 220 back will have the 120 film a little forward of the optimal plane due to the 120 paper backing.

    Spacing might be a little off since the 120 rolls thicken quicker than 220 film due to the paper backing, also.
    No difference in film plane position since it is held against the rail on the body. Using 120 in 220 back will result in uneeded tension on your film and winding mechanism.

  5. #5
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    In a practical frugal sense it works fine, at least with RB backs. The 220 backs can be had less expensively than 120 backs.

    Watch the counter though. On the RB you get ten 6x7 fames but it will count out a bit further; once you see fame 11 pop up advance through the rest until you are sure the film has wound onto the take up reel.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  6. #6
    henk@apug's Avatar
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    http://www.collection-appareils.fr/x...92-Mamiya.html

    It is in french, but there is a note that you can use 120 film in 220 back, by screwing off a little piece on the 220 back
    (See 2nd last picture)

  7. #7
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MFstooges View Post
    No difference in film plane position since it is held against the rail on the body. Using 120 in 220 back will result in uneeded tension on your film and winding mechanism.
    True that the inner pair of rails don't change position, but for the film to stay flat during the exposure the film should be lying against the pressure plate, not floating in the channel. The pressure plate is slightly farther forward (toward the lens) in most 220 film backs. A few pieces of tape on the outer rails can re-position the pressure plate farther back in some cases.

  8. #8
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ic-racer View Post
    True that the inner pair of rails don't change position, but for the film to stay flat during the exposure the film should be lying against the pressure plate, not floating in the channel. The pressure plate is slightly farther forward (toward the lens) in most 220 film backs. A few pieces of tape on the outer rails can re-position the pressure plate farther back in some cases.
    I'm not understanding how the tape could help.

    An unmodified 220 back will hold 120 film tighter to the rails, there will be less channel float with 120.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  9. #9
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Not to long ago, when Mamiya USA maintained an internet archive of information about their "legacy" equipment, they had a "FAQ" section that answered this question about RB backs. In essence they said that it will work, but the extra thickness of the film plus backing may cause premature wear in the 220 insert, due to increased tension. And of course the counter will mislead.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    ... And of course the counter will mislead.
    ... especially on that 13th frame!

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